Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40

By Donald S. Strong | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
Typical Minor Groups

THE JAMES TRUE ASSOCIATES

A ONE-MAN concern, the James True Associates, resembles the Edmondson Economic Service in a number of respects. It has made no pretense at being a membership organization. It has operated chiefly through a weekly newsletter called the Industrial Control Report. It differs from Edmondson's organization in that its literature reaches a much smaller number of people -- principally because Edmondson keeps the price of his weekly letter within the reach of the man in the street while James True charges the comparatively high price of twelve dollars a year for his reports.

The James True Associates first appeared in July 1933. Like all of the organizations in this study save the Industrial Defense Association and the American Vigilant Intelligence Federation, it was born of the depression. For a time the Associates had a subordinate organization called "America First," a channel for distributing propaganda to those persons unwilling to pay the twelve-dollars-a-year fee for the newsletter. It appears, however, that "America First" existed chiefly on paper.


LEADERSHIP

James B. True, Jr., head of the organization, was born on July 1, 1880. The earliest record of his career is his employment with the Chicago Tribune from 1917 through 1919. He started as an investigator in the advertising department and, when he left the Tribune, was an advertising salesman. From this period down to the time of the establishment of his organization, True remained in journalism. As he said in one of his bulletins:

When the New Deal came in, the undersigned had been a newspaper correspondent, mainly in the business field, for more than twenty years. For about twelve years he had been the Washington representative of several outstanding business publications. He had been a successful free-lance feature writer,1 and had been on the staffs of two metropolitan newspapers. His total savings amounted to about $18,000 tied up in three pieces of real estate.

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