Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40

By Donald S. Strong | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
The Operations of 121 Organizations

THE preceding chapters have dealt with 11 anti-semitic organizations -- the most important and the most typical of the 121 that have appeared in recent years. This chapter, however, will list all 121 organizations and will comment on the regions and periods that have nurtured all of them.

Although the number of the organizations creates the impression that the country is being engulfed by anti-semitic sentiment, a great proportion of them are far less significant than the short-lived Order of '76 described in Chapter XI. In many instances, an organization flashed into view only once. Such were the cases of the Christian Protective League and the American Gentile Youth Movement; the former in June 1938 circulated a few mimeographed anti-semitic letters in Mobile, Alabama, and about the same time the latter posted an anti-semitic sticker on the window of a Chicago candy store. Nothing else has ever been heard of these two organizations -- an indication of their unimportance. Quite possibly the Christian Protective League consists of three gentile tailors who feel that their poor business results from the competition of the one Jewish tailor in the neighborhood. More striking as an example of a "peanut-sized" anti-semitic organization is the National Gentile League, which has a Washington, D. C., address. The pompous name and the address suggest a powerful, nationwide organization. Actually, the League consists of an unemployed and penniless person called Donald Shea, who occasionally finds some anti-semitic sympathizer willing to buy him a decent suit of clothes and to help organize a meeting which Shea can address on behalf of the National Gentile League. The substance of many an anti- semitic group is seldom more than a pretentious name.

The list below consists of groups that are quite definitely anti- semitic. Under the name of each group are noted the location of the headquarters, the date of the first record of existence (a rough estimate of the founding date), and the status in 1940 -- active, defunct, or doubtful. (The word "doubtful" is applied to those groups of which nothing has been heard of recently, yet of which there is no proof of dissolution.) In some instances, complete information is not available.

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