Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40

By Donald S. Strong | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
Propaganda Techniques
THE propaganda of the anti-semitic movement will be treated here as a whole, paying particular attention to four aspects: the channels of distribution, the philosophy, the ultimate goal, and the types of psychological appeal.The major channels are the newspaper, magazine, pamphlet, leaflet, newsletter, book, radio, and the public meeting. The distinction between the newsletter and the leaflet requires explanation: although both sometimes resemble each other in general appearance, the former usually appears regularly while the latter is quite irregular.The channel most frequently employed is the pamphlet. Almost all anti-semitic groups have issued one or more pamphlets. For the smaller organizations -- particularly the Industrial Defense Association, the American Christian Defenders, the Order of '76, and The Paul Reveres -it is the most important channel. Next in importance are the magazine and the newsletter. Two of the magazines in the field Winrod Defender and Pelley Liberation (known for a time as Pelley's Weekly) -- have had large circulations and have been in almost continuous existence for five years or more. Edmondson's reports, James True Industrial Control Report, and Harry Jung Items of Interest and Vigilante exemplify the newsletter. Winrod's letters to his "Inner Circle" perhaps fall into this category; they have appeared on an average of about once a month. Pelley once attempted to establish a newsletter service but failed.Four groups have used newspapers with varying success.
The German-American Bund: Deutscher Weckruf und Beobachter and its predecessors.
The National Union for Social Justice (the Christian Front): Social Justice.
The Silver Shirts: The Silver Ranger.
The Defenders of the Christian Faith: The Revealer

Six groups have turned the public meeting to useful account. For the Bund, the Christian Front, and the Silver Shirts it has been of considerable importance. The American Vigilant Intelligence Federation and The Paul Reveres have held meetings occasionally. An interesting variation of the public meeting has been Winrod's Bible con-

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