Horace Greeley: Printer, Editor, Crusader

By Henry Luther Stoddard | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
"Don't You Want a Boy to Learn the Trade?"

NO ONE was awake earlier in the Greeley household than Hod next morning, nor more eager to finish his part of the early chores. Soon he was on his way alone on the eleven-mile road to East Poultney; at the Northern Spectator office he was told to go to the home of the Rev. Dr. Amos Bliss, a Baptist minister who was also the editor. He found him in his garden preparing the ground for its summer work. In early April turning over and breaking the frosty soil is a task for close attention, and Dr. Bliss was hard at it when he heard a voice unlike any other he had ever heard -- a voice that would have been unpleasantly shrill if it had much strength.

"Are you the man that carries on the printing office?"

In wonder Dr. Bliss stopped his spading and looked inquiringly toward the low, strange sound. Only a few yards away stood a figure as unusual in appearance as was the voice that came from it -- a boy of fourteen or fifteen years, tall and frail in body, cheeks so pale as to seem almost bloodless. The large, round head was covered with blond hair topped by a narrow-brimmed felt hat; he wore trousers that barely touched his shoes, no socks, and a close-fitting jacket like an Eton much the worse for wear and plainly outgrown. Dr. Bliss wondered why a boy so poorly clothed, so evidently destitute, was seeking him.

"Yes, I'm the man," he replied as he resumed his soil breaking, not caring to be interrupted.

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Horace Greeley: Printer, Editor, Crusader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.