Horace Greeley: Printer, Editor, Crusader

By Henry Luther Stoddard | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
The Brook Farmers: Dana and Margaret Fuller

THE FOURIERIST agitation was not without its compensating gains for Greeley. One that was to prove of great value to him and to journalism was Charles Anderson Dana, later to become editor of the New York Sun; another was Miss Sarah Margaret Fuller, organizer and first editor of the Dial, a quarterly magazine owned and contributed to by Emerson and a coterie of Boston intellectuals, few of whom ever agreed with what the others published.

For these two acquisitions to the Tribune staff Greeley owed thanks to his wife, for it was she who by visiting Brook Farm established contact. There she met Miss Fuller and brought her into the Greeley home and on the Tribune; there he met Dana, and brought him also into newspaper life. From that fraternity of idealist experimenters with world problems Greeley also brought to the Tribune George Ripley, George William Curtis, Elizabeth Peabody and William Henry Fry -- all of whom, "descending from Utopia to Journalism," as Ripley said, typify the earliest effort before the telegraph to broaden a daily newspaper beyond the dull routine of local news, carried by coach, pony express and exchange clippings. Thus the uncultured Greeley recruited his staff with scholars not one of whom had previous newspaper experience and later cleared the way for them, one by one, to positions of distinction.

Though Greeley regarded Brook Farm as "too angelic" for this practical world, he was always in sympathy with it. In LindsaySwift

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