Stanton: The Life and Times of Lincoln's Secretary of War

By Benjamin P. Thomas; Harold M. Hyman | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
ORGANIZING VICTORY

ON THE huge map which he ordered placed near his desk during his first day as War Secretary, Stanton could see what the Union had achieved in nine months of civil war. Considering the unready state of the nation when Sumter fell, there had been great accomplishments. Scratch forces had taken important rebel fortifications off the Carolinas. Westward, improvised armies had saved Kentucky and Missouri from secession, were enlarging a Unionist center around Wheeling, and were poised to move toward Tennessee and Arkansas.

In the East, likewise, swift and brave action had thwarted Maryland's secessionists, and the safety of Washington was no longer a daily gamble. Since Bull Run blighted hopes of a swift victory, McClellan had wrought vast improvements in the spirit, discipline, and drill-field performance of the greatly augmented Army of the Potomac. But though the huge force McClellan commanded now maneuvered with impressive snap, it fought only a few indecisive skirmishes. Nothing he accomplished compared with the successes of Union commanders in the Mississippi Valley.

Throughout the last half of 1861, Stanton had shared in the Northern expectation that McClellan was readying a massive onslaught southward. He came to the war office convinced that the general's immobility had been a tragic error, permitting the South to improve its defenses. During his first days in the war office, Stanton gained information that sustained him in this conviction.

Consulting the members of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, and examining their files, Stanton found ample evidence, partly from McClellan's own generals, that he had merely been toying with an army which had been fully prepared to advance against the

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Stanton: The Life and Times of Lincoln's Secretary of War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 662

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.