The Chamber Music of Brahms

By Daniel Gregory Mason | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
THE QUARTET IN C MINOR,
OPUS 51, NO. 1

CHRONOLOGY is not always very illuminating, especially in the case of a composer who, like Brahms, usually kept a manuscript by him several years before publishing it, and whose extraordinary artistic scrupulousness led him to finish his C minor Piano Quartet only after sixteen years, his first Symphony only after twenty-two, and to make the definitive version of his first chamber music work only a few years before his death. Nevertheless no aid, even the comparatively external one of chronology, is to be lightly disregarded in the interesting but difficult task of forming for ourselves a clear picture of so many-sided a mass of work as his chamber music in its entirety. Up to his thirtieth year ( May, 1863) he was obviously either expressing his romantic exuberance or making the studies that were to take him beyond it (Opus 8 Trio, D minor Piano Concerto, Piano Quartets and Quintet, Serenades for orchestra, Opus 11 and 16, and the first Sextet). The decade of his thirties ( 1863-1873) is that of the young master: --Haydn Variations, second Sextet, first Cello Sonata, Horn Trio, first two String Quartets. The mature master fills the decade from forty to fifty with beauty in richest profusion: the first two symphonies and the two overtures, the third Quartet, the first Violin Sonata, the first Viola Quintet. After 1883 we have the works of ripest art but declining energy, of which in

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Chamber Music of Brahms
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.