Prophecy and Power among the Dogrib Indians

By June Helm | Go to book overview

Introduction

North American Indian prophets and prophet movements have long attracted the attention of anthropologists. They have inspired a substantial body of analysis and theory on nativistic, messianic (embracing millenarian) and revitalistic movements, as well as crisis cults. On New Year's day 1892, James Mooney ( 1896) interviewed the Paiute prophet Wovoka. For twenty-two months before and after that interview Mooney pursued in the field the reactions of tribesmen throughout the American West to Wovoka's message of the Ghost Dance. From that time on, most ethnologists seeking evidence on the character and persona of Native American prophets have had to rely on the fading memories of native persons relaying their own observations or the accounts they gained from prior generations, or, especially in those cases far back in time, only the reports and assessments of Euro-American observers. Several modern investigators, however, have had the opportunity to evoke recent memory of dead prophets and see prophets in action among Dene peoples-- Athapaskan-speaking Indians--of northwestern Canada. Materials recently have been published on prophecy among the Beaver and Slavey Dene of British Columbia and Alberta (and will be fleetingly referred to in this study). The interests of those investigators, however, are very distinct from those I bring to this study of prophets among the Dogrib Dene.

I started ethnographic field research among the Northern Dene in 1952 in a small Slavey settlement on the bank of the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories of Canada. In 1959 I began work among the Dogribs of Lac la Martre, shifting in 1962 to Rae, the Dogrib "capital." By then change was proceeding apace in the lives, circumstances, and experiences of the Dogrib people ( Helm 1979, 1980). From 1967 to 1976 I returned to Rae for two or three weeks almost every year. To track social and political developments I usually arrived at "treaty time" (of which, more in the text), when issues between the government and the Indians

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Prophecy and Power among the Dogrib Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xii
  • Orthography xiv
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Three Styles in the Practice of Prophecy 5
  • 1 - Prelude to Prophecy 7
  • 2 - Message, Performance, and Persona 27
  • 3 - The Foundations of Prophecy 52
  • Part Two - Ink'On 73
  • 4 - One Man's Ink'On 75
  • 5 - Aspects of Ink'On 80
  • 6 - The Highest Men for Ink'On"" 101
  • 7 - Ink'On in Play and Legend 121
  • 8 - Vital Thomas: A Brief Autobiography 146
  • Appendix 155
  • Notes 158
  • References 164
  • Personal Name Index 169
  • In Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.