What Might Have Been: The Social Psychology of Counterfactual Thinking

By Neal J. Roese; James M. Olson | Go to book overview

mutability, rather than people's estimates of the chances of a negative outcome that determine the actions they take. We hope that the steps taken here, as preliminary and tentative as they are, have made it at least a little easier to imagine the counterfactual world in which counterfactual thinking is well understood.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The research reported in this chapter was supported by a grant to Dale Miller from the National Institute of Mental Health and a doctoral fellowship to Brian Taylor from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Portions of this chapter were presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, Columbus, Ohio, October 1991. We thank James Olson, Deborah Prentice, Neal Roese, and Jacquie Vorauer for their helpful critiques of an earlier version of this chapter.

Correspondence concerning the contents of this chapter should be addressed to Dale T. Miller, Department of Psychology, Green Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1010.


REFERENCES

Bell, D. E. ( 1982). "Regret in decision making under uncertainty". Operations Research, 30, 961-981.

Bell, D. E. ( 1983). "Risk premiums for decision regret". Management Science, 29, 1156-1166.

Bell, D. E. ( 1985a). "Disappointment in decision making under uncertainty". Operations Research, 33, 1-27.

Bell, D. E. ( 1985b). "Putting a premium on regret". Management Science, 31, 117-120.

Buck, M. L., & Miller, D. T. ( 1994). "Reactions to incongruous negative life events". Social Justice Research, 7, 29-46.

Carroll, J. S. ( 1978). "The effect of imagining an event on expectations for the event: An interpretation in terms of the availability heuristic". Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 14, 88-96.

Fischhoff, B. ( 1975). "Hindsight≠foresight: The effects of outcome knowledge on judgment under uncertainty". Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 1, 288-299.

Fischhoff, B. ( 1982). "For those condemned to study the past: Heuristics and biases in hindsight". In D. Kahneman, P. Slovic, & A. Tversky (Eds.), Judgment under uncertainty: Heuristics and biases (pp. 422-444). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Fishbum, P. ( 1983). "Nontransitive measurable utility". Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 26, 31-67.

Gilovich, T., Medvec, V. H., & Chen, S. ( 1995). "Omission, commission, and dissonance reduction: Coping with regret in the Monty Hall problem". Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 21, 182-190.

Goldaper, S. ( 1990, June 9). "Pistons put the game on the line". The New York Times, p. C46.

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