On World History: An Anthology

By Johann Gottfried Herder; Hans Adler et al. | Go to book overview

22
The Nature of the Peoples on the Islands of the Tropical Zone
Nothing is more difficult than to characterize the main features of the countries scattered over the bosom of the ocean. For as they are remote from one another, and have been peopled for the most part by different migrants from near or far regions and at different points in time, and each, therefore, in a way constitutes its own little world, they represent to the intellect in the study of nations as multicolored a picture as they do to the eye on the map. Yet even here the principal features can never be denied when it comes to the general order of nature.
1. On most of the Asiatic islands, we meet with a kind of Negroid people who appear to be their most original inhabitants.* They are, depending on the variety of the region in which they live, of varying shades of blackness, with frizzy, woolly hair; here and there appear the protruding lips, the flat nose, and the white teeth, and, what is noteworthy, with this physical makeup there also is found the temperament of the Negro. The same raw and robust strength, the carefree mind, the boisterous sensuality, which we observed in the blacks of the continent, are evident also in the Negrilloes of the islands, yet everywhere proportionate to their climate and mode of living. Many of these peoples are still at the lowest stage of development, because they were pushed up into the mountains by later arrivals who now live on the shores and in the plains; thus there is little genuine and reliable information about them available.**
____________________
*
Sprengel Geschichte der Philippinen, Forster's Nachrichten von Borneo u. a. [und anderen] Inseln in the Beiträgen zur Völker- und Länderkunde, vol. 2, pp. 57, 237 f; Allgemeine Reisen, vol. 2, p. 393; Le Gentil Reisen, in Ebeling Sammlung, vol. 4, p. 70. 1
**
See Reisen um die Welt, vol. 1 ( Leipzig: 1775), p. 554. 2

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
On World History: An Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.