Waves of Rancor: Tuning in the Radical Right

By Robert L. Hilliard; Michael C. Keith | Go to book overview

Chapter 1 The Genesis of Bitter Air

Who stilleth the raging of the sea, and the noise of his waves, and the madness of the people.

--Prayer Book, 1662

Radio and television are the most powerful forces in the world today affecting the minds and emotions of their viewers and listeners. In virtually every country in the world, with the exception of those poverty-stricken nations where television is available only to the rich, and radio sets are in short supply, most people spend more time viewing television or listening to the radio than they devote to any other endeavor except working (if, in fact, they have a job that takes up more than thirty-five hours of their time each week) and sleeping (if, in fact, they sleep more than an average of seven hours per day).

In the United States, for example, the average television set is on twenty- eight hours per week and the average radio is tuned in two and one-half hours a day. It is not surprising, then, that whenever there is a rebellion or revolution in a country, the first thing fought for is not the treasury, not the government buildings, not the universities, not the shops, not even the airports--but the radio and television stations.

For the last decades of the twentieth century, radio has been the most pervasive medium, simply because of its economic and technological availability to more people. In 1975 Julian Hale wrote:

Radio is the only unstoppable medium of mass communication. It is the only medium which reaches across the entire globe instantaneously and can convey a message from any country to any other. Combined, these qualities of radio ensure that it plays an indispensable role in international communications and keeps its place as the most powerful weapon of international propaganda. 1

During the quarter-century since this was written, other media--television, cable, satellite, and the Internet--have become important additional factors.

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Waves of Rancor: Tuning in the Radical Right
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter 1 the Genesis of Bitter Air 3
  • Appendices to Chapter 1 31
  • Chapter 2 for Which They Stand 37
  • Appendices to Chapter 2 73
  • Chapter 3 Lions of the Arena 86
  • Appendices to Chapter 3 117
  • Chapter 4 but Carry a Big Stick 131
  • Appendices to Chapter 4 145
  • Chapter 5 Gott Mit Uns 153
  • Chapter 6 High-Stepping for Hitler 165
  • Appendix to Chapter 6 184
  • Chapter 7 in No One Do We Trust 186
  • Appendix to Chapter 7 211
  • Chapter 8 Up Close and Right 218
  • Chapter 9 Armed for the Right 240
  • Appendices to Chapter 9 253
  • Notes 279
  • Index 301
  • About the Authors 311
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