Waves of Rancor: Tuning in the Radical Right

By Robert L. Hilliard; Michael C. Keith | Go to book overview

Chapter 7 In No One Do We Trust

Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice.

-- Barry Goldwater

All government is evil and the parent of evil.

-- John L. O'Sullivan

While using Barry Goldwater's words quoted above to justify their existence and behavior, many of the far right and extremist organizations are not so quick to acknowledge Goldwater's other statements, such as his defense of homosexuals in the military and his admonition to the Christian right to stay out of politics.


Patriots

The " Patriot Movement" is the generic term under which most of the far right and extremist groups fall. There have always been self-designated "patriots," some stemming from the colonial revolution against what were considered to be oppressive (perhaps equated with "dictatorial" today) policies of the English crown, others periodically rising and failing as individual state governments or the federal government was threatened by outside forces, and still others simply the result of jingoistic or nationalistic fervor engendered by headline- and power-seeking politicians (as during the McCarthy era). Some individual "patriots" adopt that designation as a means of aggrandizing or, perhaps, finding a substitute for, a weak, unsuccessful, useless, frustrating, or impotent personal life. Many in today's Patriot Movement have joined for those very reasons. But the movement has grown beyond simply a handful of emotionally ill or societally sad men and boys. The federal government's use of excessive force on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco and against the Weaver family in Ruby Ridge, Idaho, provided the flashpoint of political justification for the Patriot Movement and spurred the development of a key part of that movement, the

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Waves of Rancor: Tuning in the Radical Right
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter 1 the Genesis of Bitter Air 3
  • Appendices to Chapter 1 31
  • Chapter 2 for Which They Stand 37
  • Appendices to Chapter 2 73
  • Chapter 3 Lions of the Arena 86
  • Appendices to Chapter 3 117
  • Chapter 4 but Carry a Big Stick 131
  • Appendices to Chapter 4 145
  • Chapter 5 Gott Mit Uns 153
  • Chapter 6 High-Stepping for Hitler 165
  • Appendix to Chapter 6 184
  • Chapter 7 in No One Do We Trust 186
  • Appendix to Chapter 7 211
  • Chapter 8 Up Close and Right 218
  • Chapter 9 Armed for the Right 240
  • Appendices to Chapter 9 253
  • Notes 279
  • Index 301
  • About the Authors 311
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