Talking Radio: An Oral History of American Radio in the Television Age

By Michael C. Keith | Go to book overview

TALKING RADIO
An Oral History of American Radio in the Television Age

Michael C. Keith

M.E.Sharpe

Armonk, New York
London, England

-iii-

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Talking Radio: An Oral History of American Radio in the Television Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Cast of Contributors xiii
  • Part I - The War Ends and the Picture Begins 1
  • 1 - The Quiet after and before Radio's Victory and Short Peace 3
  • 2 - Assault of the Infant Television Takes over the Living Room 10
  • 3 - Together . . . but Separate When the Two Worked as One 17
  • 4 - The Word Is the Thing the Substance of Sound 23
  • 5 - In Mourning and Evening 32
  • 6 - Reinventing Itself 38
  • Part II - The Second Coming of Radio 53
  • 7 - Home of the Hits Going to the Top 40 55
  • 8 - Airy Personas 64
  • 9 - At the Top of the Hour 70
  • 10 - Chatter That Matters 77
  • 11 - The Good Air 87
  • 12 - The Bad Air 94
  • Part III - The Times and Bands Are A-Changin' 101
  • 13 - People's Radio 103
  • 14 - Under Suspicion 109
  • 15 - Equality for Some 115
  • 16 - Descent from Dominance 129
  • 17 - Ascent of Fidelity 135
  • 18 - Shock Waves 144
  • Part IV - Into the New Millennium 151
  • 19 - Business by the Book Impressions Count 153
  • 20 - Going Public 161
  • 21 - Turn of the Screw 170
  • 22 - Hoarding the Air Stations in the Fold 178
  • 23 - In the Air Ahead 186
  • 24 - Seems Radio Is Here to Stay by Norman Corwin a Play for Broadcast 195
  • Further Reading 209
  • Index 211
  • About the Author 224
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