Risky Business? Pac Decisionmaking in Congressional Elections

By Robert Biersack; Paul S. Herrnson et al. | Go to book overview

17 JustLife Action

Mary E. Bendyna, R.S.M.

JustLife Action is a small ideological PAC that defines itself as "pro-justice," "pro-life," and "pro-peace." 1 Unlike most ideological groups or groups committed either to a pro-life stance or to issues of justice and peace, JustLife Action advocates a "consistent ethic of life" that seeks to protect and promote human life "from womb to tomb." This consistent ethic of life, which is also referred to as the "seamless garment," calls for moral consistency in addressing the many threats to human life in the world today. 2

At present, JustLife Action focuses on the issues of poverty, abortion, and the arms race, which it views as posing the most immediate threats to justice and life. In particular, JustLife Action advocates policies that support the economic and social needs of women and children, that provide equal access to education and health care for all, that protect the unborn, that reduce the production and distribution of weapons of mass destruction, and that reallocate human and financial resources to meet basic human needs and provide equal opportunity for all. Although JustLife Action has chosen for the present to focus its efforts on these issues, it emphasizes that all life issues, including euthanasia, capital punishment, drug addiction, sexism, and racism, must be seen as interwoven in the seamless garment.


Organization and History

JustLife Action was founded as JustLife PAC in 1985 by David Medema, Stephen Monsma, Ronald Sider, Juli Loesch Wiley, and others who shared a commitment to a consistent pro-life stance. The immediate impetus for the creation of JustLife PAC was the unsuccessful congressional campaign of Stephen Monsma. Monsma, a pro- life liberal Democrat, believed it was necessary not only to oppose abortion but also to advocate policies that provide alternatives to abortion and offer assistance to

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