The Price of Independence: A Realistic View of the American Revolution

By Broadus Mitchell | Go to book overview

Mutiny

BRIGADIER GENERAL ANTHONY WAYNE'S COMMAND OF PENNSYLVANIA CONTINENTALS WAS SUFFERING DEEP AND PECULIAR DISTRESSES. THE ELEVEN REGIMENTS AND CORPS OF artillery, 2500 men and officers, had encamped in "Jockey Hollow," adjacent to Morristown, New Jersey, at the end of November 1780. There, they repaired old huts and worked on fortifications. Their issues of rum were discontinued; they washed down their dry bread and beef with cold water. They were literally out at elbows; Wayne planned to have the tails of their coats cut off to make patches, and he could have had their battered hats turned into serviceable caps if only the Pennsylvania Council would send needles and thread. The men's over-alls were tattered, "and what was once a poor substitute for a blanket (now divided among three soldiers), is but very wretched living and shelter against the winter's piercing cold, drifting snow, and chilling sleets."

Wayne warned against threatened rebellion: "Our soldiery are not devoid of reasoning faculties, nor are they callous to the first feelings of nature. They have now served their country for near five years, poorly clothed, badly fed, and worse paid . . . they have

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The Price of Independence: A Realistic View of the American Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents 1
  • Rash Incursion 3
  • The War Within 18
  • Disabilities of Congress 36
  • Inglorious General 56
  • Anti-Washington Clique 71
  • Money Troubles 86
  • The Soldier and His Arms 113
  • The Hardest Winters 129
  • The Sick and Wounded 143
  • Prisoners of War 167
  • Treason 185
  • Mutiny 204
  • Hirelings 224
  • Broken Engagement 241
  • Flaming Frontiers 252
  • Fire and Sword on the Connecticut Coast 275
  • Burden of Command 289
  • Restless Camp 313
  • Vexation at Paris 331
  • Selected Bibliography 349
  • Index 359
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