Measuring Advertising Effectiveness

By William D. Wells | Go to book overview

Comments on Chapter 17

Brian Wansink Univershy of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

The consistency and thoughtfulness that have been used to collect this database enable one to develop important insights into the copy testing process. In the studies described by Kuse, there are lessons for both practitioners and researchers. After exploring the potential insights that can be gained from ad wear out data, I focus on the important implications and on the potential usefulness of the difference score that was used to measure ad persuasiveness.


WHAT ELSE INFLUENCES ADVERTISING WEAR-OUT?

An overwhelming conclusion of the studies described by Kuse confirms academic findings that an ad wears out if it is not alternated with other executions. Although wear-out varies across product categories and across ad executions, other important generalizations can be made. For instance, it may be possible to determine how effectiveness levels vary depending on prior usage habits or on ad processing involvement. It might be that the optimal number of exposures of a particular execution dramatically varies depending on whether the primary target of the campaign was loyal users or nonusers.

Furthermore, Broach, Page, and Wilson (chap. 12, this volume) suggest that wear-out may also be affected by media placement. One might argue, for instance, that an ad embedded in a highly involving drama would wear out more quickly than if the same ad was embedded in a situation comedy.


USING DIFFERENCE SCORES FOR INCREASED MEASUREMENT SENSITIVITY

The ad Persuasion score is obtained by subtracting the percentage of people who select the target brand prior to ad exposure from the percentage who select it afterward. Such difference measures have some very attractive properties and are worth reconsideration for academic research. The within-subject design is more statistically powerful and requires fewer subjects than the more traditionally used between-subject designs. Concerns about reactivity and contamination are moderated by the positive correlation of these results with split-cable tests.

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