Palanpur, the Economy of an Indian Village

By C. J. Bliss; N. H. Stern | Go to book overview

3
Theory and India

§ 3.0 Introduction

There are many theories and claims concerning the agricultural sector of less- developed countries, the structure of their village economies, and the behaviour of the participants in these economies. The purpose of this chapter is to expound, discuss, and occasionally develop certain of these theories so that in later chapters we can use them to help understand some aspects of Palanpur and comment on them in the light of the experience of Palanpur. We shall also describe some observations and propositions which have been made concerning Indian agriculture and its recent history insofar as the data from Palanpur allow us to contribute something to the discussion.

Our primary interest is in the allocation of factors of production and it will be convenient to divide our discussion into land, labour, and capital. We wish to examine the allocation of factors between activities, individuals, and groups. We must remember, of course, that markets cannot be considered in isolation. A discussion of share-cropping, for example, leads immediately to an analysis of land, labour, and capital markets and decisions, since a bargain between tenant and landlord will usually involve an understanding over the level of several inputs. The importance of a simultaneous examination of the various markets is a theme which will recur.

We shall take a fairly broad view of the definition of factors. We include migration in the discussion of labour, and irrigation and fertilizer under capital. Draught animals and power are examined together with land. We begin in § 3.1 with an examination of certain general views of the manner in which a village economy, or the economy of a less-developed country, operates. The second, and largest, substantive section of this chapter concerns land. The disposition of land must be at the centre of the study of an agricultural economy. Further the nature of the contracts governing the use of land, particularly share-tenancy, has been a popular subject with theorists both recently and amongst classical writers such as Smith, Ricardo, and Marshall. We discuss certain theories of the determination of wages and the allocation of labour in § 3.3 and examine capital inputs such as irrigation and fertilizers, and the nature of credit for their use, in § 3.4. In the course of our discussion of theories of factor markets we shall consider a variety of assumptions about the objectives of agents and we focus attention on this issue in § 3.5.

The second part of the chapter is particularly concerned with observations and propositions concerning India. In § 3.6 we examine the arguments of Hopper and others who have studied the question of efficiency by estimating agricultural production functions and comparing the value of marginal products to prices. The debate on farm-size and productivity is summarised in § 3.7. We provide, in § 3.8, a brief discussion of the geographical and historical variations in India of the form of share contract and in § 3.9 we present a

-50-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Palanpur, the Economy of an Indian Village
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Village 8
  • Appendix to Chapter 2 34
  • 3 - Theory and India 50
  • Appendix to Chapter 3 88
  • 4 - Markets in Palanpur 90
  • 5 - Tenancy 124
  • 6 - Output and Income 167
  • Appendix to Chapter 6 211
  • 7 - Wheat : The New Varieties and Practices in Palanpur 222
  • 8 - Wheat: Productivity and Expectations 251
  • 9 - Reflections on Economic Theory 299
  • 10 - A Revisit and Some Speculations on the Future 314
  • Glossary 327
  • References 331
  • Author Index 335
  • Subject Index 336
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.