McTeague: A Story of San Francisco

By Frank Norris; Jerome Loving | Go to book overview

II

AFTER his breakfast the following Monday morning, McTeague looked over the appointments he had written down in the book-slate that hung against the screen. His writing was immense, very clumsy, and very round, with huge, full-bellied l's and h's. He saw that he had made an appointment at one o'clock for Miss Baker, the retired dressmaker, a little old maid who had a tiny room a few doors down the hall. It adjoined that of Old Grannis.

Quite an affair had arisen from this circumstance. Miss Baker and Old Grannis were both over sixty, and yet it was current talk amongst the lodgers of the flat that the two were in love with each other. Singularly enough, they were not even acquaintances; never a word had passed between them. At intervals they met on the stairway; he on his way to his little dog hospital, she returning from a bit of marketing in the street. At such times they passed each other with averted eyes, pretending a certain preoccupation, suddenly seized with a great embarrassment, the timidity of a second childhood. He went on about his business, disturbed and thoughtful. She hurried up to her tiny room, her curious little false curls shaking with her agitation, the faintest suggestion of a flush coming and going in her withered cheeks. The emotion of one of these chance meetings remained with them during all the rest of the day.

Was it the first romance in the lives of each? Did Old Grannis ever remember a certain face amongst those that he had known when he was young Grannis--the face of some pale-haired girl, such as one sees in the old cathedral towns of England? Did Miss Baker still treasure up in a seldom opened drawer or box some faded daguerreotype, some strange old-fashioned likeness, with its curling hair and high stock? It was impossible to say.

Maria Macapa, the Mexican woman who took care of the lodgers' rooms, had been the first to call the flat's

-15-

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McTeague: A Story of San Francisco
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Note on the Text xxix
  • Select Bibliography xxx
  • A Chronology of Frank Norris xxxii
  • I 5
  • II 15
  • III 30
  • IV 42
  • V 52
  • VI 71
  • VII 87
  • VIII 103
  • IX 119
  • X 142
  • XI 164
  • XII 185
  • XIII 198
  • XIV 208
  • XV 218
  • XVI 232
  • XVII 246
  • XVIII 252
  • XIX 268
  • XX 289
  • XXI 298
  • XXII 327
  • Explanatory Notes 337
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