This Stage-Play World: Texts and Contexts, 1580-1625

By Julia Briggs | Go to book overview

Chronology

Normally, dates given for books are those of first publication and for plays, those of first performances and so are often approximate.

1509 Accession of Henry VIII.
1515 Erasmus, In Praise of Folly.
1516Sir Thomas More, Utopia.
1517-21 Lutheran Reformation begins in Germany.
1525 Tyndale translates the New Testament.
1531 Elyot, The Boke named the Governour.
1532 Henry VIII divorces Catherine of Aragon.
1533 Henry VIII excommunicated, marries Anne Boleyn; birth of
Elizabeth I.
1534 Acts of Succession and Supremacy mark formal breach
between England and Rome; Anabaptists take control of
Munster.
1535 Execution of More and Fisher.
1536 Calvin Institutes (first Latin version).
1536-9 Dissolution of monasteries.
1542-7 Henry VIII dissipates wealth taken from the Church on
campaigns in Scotland and France.
1543 Publication of Copernicus De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium.
1545 Council of Trent begins reform of Roman Catholic Church (till 1563). John Bale, The Image of Both Churches.
1547 Death of Henry VIII; accession of Edward VI. Period of radical Protestantism begins in English Church.
1549 First Protestant Prayer Book (mainly by Cranmer).
1552 Second Prayer Book. Birth of Spenser.
1553 Death of Edward VI; accession of Mary Tudor. Catholicism re-established in England; Protestants flee to Geneva and
Zurich. Stevenson (?), Gammer Gurton's Needle. Hakluyt
born.
1554 Mary marries Philip of Spain. Births of Lyly, Hooker,
Raleigh, and Sidney.
1555 Burning of Latimer and Ridley. Peace of Augsburg accepts

-301-

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This Stage-Play World: Texts and Contexts, 1580-1625
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • An Opus Book This Stage-Play World i
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface to the Revised Edition v
  • Contents xv
  • 1 - Change and Continuity 1
  • 2 - Order and Society 19
  • 3 - Women and the Family 47
  • 4 - Other Peoples, Other Lands 79
  • 5 - The Natural World 108
  • 6 - Religion 136
  • 8 - The Court and Its Arts 203
  • 9 - The Theatre 250
  • Conclusion the Music of Division 292
  • Chronology 301
  • References 310
  • Further Reading 322
  • Index 340
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