A Practical Introduction to Phonetics

By J. C. Catford | Go to book overview

List of Figures
1.The vocal tract8
2.Basic components of speech-sound production13
3.Experiment 3: Remove initiation13
4.Experiment 4: Remove articulation15
5.Experiment 5: Add initiation16
6.Experiment 6: Add articulation16
7.Experiment 7: Superimpose stop on air-stream18
8.Pressure and suction varieties of [f]21
9.Pressure and suction varieties of [s]22
10.Three stages in the production of glottalic pressure [k']23
11.Experiment 17: Three phases in the production of a velaric suction stop (the click [ʇ])29
12.Experiment 23: Voiceless and voiced fricatives38
13.Aerodynamics of a voiced stop46
14.Voiceless and voiced stop and fricative48
15.Mechanism of voiced glottalic suction stop (voiced implosive)49
16.Initiation of voiced plosives and voiced implosives51
17.States of the glottis54
18.Aspiration and voicing of stops58
19.Major stricture types73
20.Major stricture types in the transverse dimension75
21.The major articulatory areas77
22.Some features of the oral cavity79
23.Upper articulatory locations80
24.Subdivisions of the tongue81
25.Lower articulatory locations82
26.Two extreme types of alveolar ridge87
27.Apico-dentalveolar stop articulations87
28.Lamino-dentalveolar stop articulations88
29.Apico-dentalveolar fricative articulations90
30.Lamino-dentalveolar fricative articulations90
31.Retroflex articulations: (a) stop (b) flap93

-xii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Practical Introduction to Phonetics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Figures xii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Basic Components of Speech 11
  • 3 - Phonation: a Third Basic Component 36
  • 4 - Articulation: Stricture Types 62
  • 5 - Articulation: Locations 76
  • 6 - Co-Articulation and Sequence 103
  • 7 - Vowels: Introduction 123
  • 8 - The Cardinal Vowels (Cvs) 138
  • 9 - Prosodic Features 172
  • 10 - Sound-Systems of Languages 187
  • 11 - Review 217
  • For Further Reading 229
  • References 231
  • Appendix the International Phonetic Alphabet (Revised to 1989) 232
  • Index 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 242

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.