The Landscape Painting of China and Japan

By Hugo Munsterberg | Go to book overview

5
The Northern Sung Period

THE eleventh century built upon the foundations provided by the artistic developments of the tenth, and the result was a flowering of Chinese painting in general, and the landscape in particular, which has seldom been equalled and certainly never surpassed in the history of art. Kuo Hsi was the outstanding painter of this period: such was the opinion of Kuo Jo-hsü in 1074, 56 a verdict with which later critics would readily agree. As he was born in 1020 and died in 1090, the main part of his artistic career falls into the second half of the eleventh century, during which time he was the leading painter- scholar at the Imperial Academy of Painting. His extraordinary fame rests as much upon his literary activities as on his painting for, as we had seen above, his essay on landscape painting entitled Lin Ch'üan Kao Chih, or "The Lofty Message of Forests and Streams," is probably the most famous of all Chinese writings on the art of landscape painting. In it his own thoughts on the subject as well as the more general philosophy of landscape painting are discussed. In writing about the different seasons and how they are reflected in nature, he says:

Spring and summer views of the mountains have certain aspects; autumn and winter views have others. That is to say, the scenery of the four seasons is not the same. The morning view of the mountain has its own appearance, the evening its own; views on a clear day or cloudy day still their own. That is to say, the morning and evening

-43-

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The Landscape Painting of China and Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About the Author *
  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Note viii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Plates xi
  • The Landscape Painting of China 1
  • 1 - The Spirit of Chinese Landscape Painting 3
  • 2 - The Beginnings of Chinese Landscape Painting 13
  • 3 - The T'Ang Period 19
  • 4 - The Fire Dynasties and Early Sung Periods 31
  • 5 - The Northern Sung Period 43
  • 6 - The Southern Sung Period 51
  • 7 - The Yüan Period 59
  • 8 - The Ming Period 65
  • 9 - The Ch'Ing Period 73
  • The Landscape Painting of Japan 79
  • 10 - The Beginnings of Landscape Painting in Japan 81
  • 11 - The Heian and Kamakura Periods 87
  • 12 - The Muromachi Period 95
  • 13 - The Momoyama Period 105
  • 14 - The Edo Period 111
  • 15 - Landscape Painters of the Ukiyo-E School 121
  • Notes 129
  • Bibliography 135
  • Index 139
  • Plates 145
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