Confucius to Cummings: An Anthology of Poetry

By Marcella Spann; Ezra Pound | Go to book overview

Preface

Courses in English literature can arouse curiosity and give the student a taste for reading things she or he would like to remember in later life. As an English instructor I have found it almost impossible to stimulate such curiosity through the use of the textbooks available. One is often forced to run a mimeograph machine, or to require students to purchase paperbacks, of which only small portions prove suitable.

One of my teachers, Professor Vincent Miller, insisted that his students learn to read, i.e., to understand the meaning of poems. When a student examines poetry as closely as this teacher insisted on our examining it, he begins to distinguish the real from the sham. No one textbook served Professor Miller's purpose.

In collecting material for the present volume, the teacher's dilemma was the first which Mr. Pound and I had to consider. But is the teacher really in a different box from the student or the most casual reader? The problem is universal: to arouse curiosity, not kill it, and this without implying false values or false views of proportion.

As this volume is intended for those who read only English, we have been limited in our selection to poems written in English, or those translated or adapted into it. William Cookson has said that it would be nearly impossible to assemble a body of writing in any language that "for wisdom and continuous beauty" would stand against the Classic Anthology Defined by Confucius; in choosing the poems included here we have kept this challenge, and the example of the Confucian collection, in mind.

We have also been mindful of the difference between the occidental and the oriental approach to instruction. Su-Lung Wang, in A Daughter of Confucius, tells us that when she began to learn English she read that "the cat can see the rat." Thinking of her first day in her Chinese family school, where she had learned that "the nature of man is originally good," she concluded that "education in English seemed less philosophical."

The arrangement of this volume is--with one exception, ex-

-vii-

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Confucius to Cummings: An Anthology of Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Confucius to Cummings ix
  • Publisher's Note xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Confucius [c. 551-479 B.C.] 3
  • Homer [c. 950-900 B.C.] 15
  • Sappho [630-552 B.C.] 18
  • Aeschylus [525-426 B.C.] 19
  • Sophokles [496-406 B.C.] 22
  • Theocritus [fl. 270 B.C.] 25
  • Lucretius [c. 99-55 B.C.] 32
  • Catullus [?84-54? B.C.] 33
  • Virgil [70-19 B.C.] 34
  • Horace [65-8 B.C.] 35
  • Ovid [43 B.C.-18 A.D.] 37
  • Conclusion 65
  • Rutilius [fl. 416 A.D.] 66
  • Boethius [c. 475-525] 68
  • Anonymous [anglo-Saxon, 8th Century] 69
  • Rihaku (Li Po) [c. 700-762] 72
  • Godeschalk [805-869] 75
  • Anonymous [12th Century] 77
  • The "Old Captive" [?1130 Fl.] 79
  • Bertrans De Born [c. 1140-1214] 80
  • Bernart De Ventadorn [1148-1195] 81
  • Walther von der Vogelweide [?1170-1230?] 82
  • Arnaut Daniel [c. 1180-1200] 84
  • Saint Francis of Assisi [1182-1226] 86
  • Guido Guinicelli[1220-1275] 88
  • Folgore da San Gemignano [fl. 1250] 90
  • Guido Cavalcanti [1250-1300] 91
  • Dante Alighieri [1265-1321] 96
  • Conclusion 98
  • Anonymous [c. 1300] 100
  • William Langland [?1330-1390] 101
  • Geoffrey Chaucer [?1340-1400] 102
  • Anonymous [c. 1350] 107
  • Charles d'OrlCB)ans [1391-1465] 108
  • Anonymous [15th century] 108
  • François Villon [1431-1463] 111
  • Lorenzo De' Medici, the Magnificent [1449-1492] 118
  • Michelangelo Buonarotti [1475-1564] 119
  • Martin Luther [1483-1546] 120
  • Henry VIII [1491-1547] 122
  • William Cornish [?-1524] 124
  • Heath [temp. Henry VIII] 125
  • Anonymous [16th century] 126
  • Thomas Wyatt [?1503-1542] 127
  • Santa Teresa D'Avila [1515-1582] 127
  • Joachim Du Bellay [?1522-1560] 128
  • Pierre De Ronsard [1525-1585] 128
  • Elizabeth I [1533-1603] 129
  • George Turberville [?1540-1610] 131
  • Walter Ralegh [?1552-1618] 132
  • A. W. [fl. 1585] 136
  • Anthony Munday [c. 1553-1633] 139
  • Robert Greene [?1558-1592] 139
  • Anonymous [c. 1600] 142
  • Robert Wilson [?-1600] 143
  • Samuel Daniel [1562-1619] 143
  • Christopher Marlowe [1564-1593] 146
  • William Shakespeare [1564-1616] 148
  • Conclusion 149
  • John Davies [1569-1626] 172
  • Ben Jonson [1572-1637] 173
  • Robert Herrick [1591-1674] 174
  • Edmund Waller [1606-1687] 175
  • Pietro Metastasio [1698-1782] 177
  • Marie-Françoise-Catherine De Beauveau, La Marquise De Boufflers [1711-1786] 178
  • Christopher Smart [1722-1771] 179
  • George Crabbe [1754-1832] 182
  • Robert Burns [1759-1796] 197
  • Walter Savage Landor [1775-1864] 200
  • George Gordon, Lord Byron [1788-1824] 201
  • Fitz-Greene Halleck [1790-1867] 206
  • Felicia Dorothea Hemans [1793-1835] 210
  • John Keats [1795-1821] 211
  • Thomas Lovell Beddoes [1803-1849] 213
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning [1806-1861] 215
  • John Greenleaf Whittier [1807-1892] 218
  • Théophile Gautier [1811-1872] 221
  • Robert Browning [1812-1889] 221
  • Herman Melville [1819-1891] 256
  • Walt Whitman [1819-1892] 256
  • Dante Gabriel Rossetti [1828-1882] 271
  • Algernon Charles Swinburne [1837-1909] 272
  • Francis Bret Harte [1836-1902] 274
  • James Whitcomb Riley [1849-1916] 276
  • Benjamin Franklin King, Jr. [1857-1894] 277
  • Anonymous [egyptian, C. 1200-1169 B.C.] 278
  • Thomas Hardy [1840-1928] 283
  • William Butler Yeats [1865-1939] 287
  • Ford Madox Ford [1873-1939] 290
  • Padraic Colum [1881-1972] 305
  • Wyndham Lewis [1883-1957] 306
  • William Carlos Williams [1883-1963] 307
  • Ezra Pound [1885-1972] 308
  • H. D. [hilda Doolittle] [1886-1961] 311
  • Marianne Moore [1886-1972] 311
  • Basil Bunting [1900- ] 313
  • E. E. Cummings [1894-1963] 316
  • Postscript 319
  • Postscript 321
  • Section for Instructors 323
  • Appendix I 325
  • Appendix II 329
  • Appendix II 335
  • Appendix IV 336
  • Appendix V 337
  • Indices 341
  • Index of Poets and Translators 343
  • Index of Titles and First Lines of Poems 345
  • New Directions Paperbooks--A Partial Listing 355
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