Miscellanies, Literary & Historical - Vol. 1

By Lord Rosebery | Go to book overview

XII
LORD SALISBURY1

I Do not know that I was ever in a more difficult position in the whole course of my life. It seemed easy enough, in the leafy month of June, when you invited me, some time in November, to perform the duty of to-day, to say "Yes" to the invitation so gracefully proffered. But now, when I come face to face with the facts, I begin to think I was the very last person who ought to have been chosen for this duty. I am in a threefold difficulty. In the first place, it is too near the time at which we lost the statesman whom we commemorate to-day to be able to appreciate fully and entirely his position, his historical position, in the annals of his country. Secondly, it seems to me that the duty should have been confided to one who was more closely connected with him, to one who could speak with more experience of his private life, and to one who, at any rate, had had the pleasure of being his colleague or his follower. Perhaps it was with a pleasant sense of paradox that you, Mr. President, threw the handkerchief to me. But

____________________
1
A Speech delivered on unveiling the memorial bust in the Oxford Union, November 14, 1904.

-264-

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Miscellanies, Literary & Historical - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Note v
  • Contents vii
  • I - Appreciations 1
  • I - Robert Burns 3
  • II - Dr. Johnson 31
  • III - Thackeray 59
  • IV - Cromwell 77
  • V - Frederick the Great 101
  • VI - Burke 130
  • VII - William Windham 145
  • VIII - The Coming of Bonaparte 160
  • IX - Sir Robert Peel 185
  • X - Dr:Chalmers 238
  • XI - Mr. Gladstone 255
  • XII - Lord Salisbury 264
  • XIII - Lord Randolph Churchill 275
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