The Challenge of the Medieval Text: Studies in Genre and Interpretation

By W. T. H. Jackson; Joan M. Ferrante et al. | Go to book overview

to write an epic because he was not the man for such a task is nullified by his poem praising the very deeds which would have been the stuff of the epic and ostensibly showing his Emperor as the personification of imperial justice. Yet the imagery shows that he regards these deeds as the subject for a mock-epic, not an epic, and his biblical imagery makes it clear that the tribute due to Caesar has been vastly exceeded by the powers which Barbarossa has abrogated to himself. The Archipoeta demonstrates that it is not the persona of the poet who tells the truth but the poet who juggles the imagery and conventions of a genre to produce effects which are often totally different from the apparent intention of the poem.


NOTES
1.
All quotations are taken from Heinrich Krefeld, Die Gedichte des Achipoeta, Heinrich Watenphul, ed. ( Heidelberg, 1958). I have followed the numbering of the poems in this edition.
2.
The exact dates of the two poems are difficult to determine. Milan was captured on March 1, 1162, so that IX must have been written after that date. It seems probable, as Krefeld suggests, that the poem would be particularly suited for presentation in Novara, and that the most likely date would therefore be September/ October 1163. A date very close to this seems indicated for IV, although the evidence is much less clear. See Krefeld, pp. 104 ff. and 131.
3.
The subject is treated in the following works: Paul Lehmann, Das literarische Bild Karls des Grossen ( Munich, 1934, repr. 1959); N. Rubinstein, "Political Rhetoric in the Imperial Chancery During the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries," Medium Aevum ( 1945), 14:22 ff.; Anette Georgi, Das lateinische und deutsche Preisgedicht des Mittelalters, Philologische Studien und Quellen, no. 48 ( Berlin, 1969).
4.
No. X in Krefeld's edition. The frequent biblical allusions, when read in context, provide a brilliant satirical commentary on the relations between the poet and Reinald von Dassel.
5.
"Omnis ergo qui audit verba mea haec et facit ea assimilabitur viro sapienti qui aedificavit domum supra petram" ( Matt. 7.24).
6.
Mark 12.41 ff.
7.
"Factum est autem in diebus illis exiit edictum Caesaris Augusti, ut describeretur universus orbis" ( Luke 2.1).
8.
"Vox clamantis in deserto parate viam Domini; rectas facite semitas eius" ( Luke 2.4).

-101-

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The Challenge of the Medieval Text: Studies in Genre and Interpretation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Publications xiii
  • One Courtly Love 1
  • I - The De Amore of Andreas Capellanus and the Practice of Love at Court 3
  • Notes 12
  • 2 - Faith Unfaithful--The German Reaction to Courtly Love 14
  • Notes 33
  • Two - Lyric 35
  • 3 - Contrast Imagery in the Poems of Friedrich Von Hausen 37
  • Note 48
  • 4 - Persona and Audience in Two Medieval Love-Lyrics 49
  • Note 65
  • 5 - The Medieval Pastourelle as a Satirical Genre 66
  • Notes 79
  • 6 - The Politics of a Poet: The Archipoeta as Revealed by His Imagery 81
  • Notes 101
  • Three - Epic and Drama 103
  • 7 - The Epic Center as Structural Determinant in Medieval Narrative Poetry 105
  • Note 124
  • 8 - Time and Space in the Ludus De Antichristo 125
  • Notes 142
  • Pyrgopolinices Converted: The Boasting Soldier in Medieval German Literature 144
  • Notes 153
  • Four - Allegory and Romance 155
  • 10 - Allegory and Allegorization 157
  • Note 171
  • II - The Nature of Romance 172
  • Notes 182
  • 12 - Problems of Communication in the Romances of Chrétien De Troyes 185
  • Note 196
  • 13 - The Arthuricity of Marie De France 197
  • Notes 217
  • 14 - The Progress of Parzival and the Trees of Virtue and Vice 218
  • Notes 225
  • 15 - The Literary Views of Gottfried Von Strassburg 226
  • Notes 246
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