Transformation: The Story of Modern Puerto Rico

By Earl Parker Hanson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
Tragic Lunacy

THE RESTLESSNESS which swept the entire Caribbean area during the 1930's was less intense in Puerto Rico than in the neighboring islands. One reason was that the Puerto Ricans are peaceful by tradition and nature; another that the United States could spend more money for relief than could the other colonial and sovereign governments. But in Puerto Rico, too, strikes began to occur in the tobacco and sugar areas and political tensions mounted to a high point.

It was one thing to know that colonialism was moribund on the island; it was another to know what to do about the matter. Old political leaders tried frantically to adhere to ideas and methods which had served them for decades; new and younger leaders pushed forward with ideas and methods which may not have been new as far as the world was concerned, but were certainly new in Puerto Rico's history.

The most dramatic of the latter, the one who made the most noise though with the smallest amount of numerical support, was the Harvard graduate Pedro Albizu Campos. He took his basic political philosophy, not from Puerto Rico's realities and needs, but from a reservoir of widespread concepts of patriotism which have by now become classical and dogmatic through the oratory and oversimplifications of history.

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Transformation: The Story of Modern Puerto Rico
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Right Shall Again Prevail v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xv
  • Chapter I - Transformation 1
  • Chapter II - The Colony 21
  • Chapter III - The Anguish of Colonialism 40
  • Chapter IV - Colonialism Bankrupt 61
  • Chapter V - Tragic Lunacy 77
  • Chapter VI - Growth of a Leader 94
  • Chapter VII - Lobbyist 116
  • Chapter VIII - Reconstruction 135
  • Chapter IX - Disintegration 152
  • Chapter X - 1940 172
  • Chapter XI - Tugwell 190
  • Chapter XIII - Neither Radical nor Conservative 227
  • Chapter XV - Power and Industry 266
  • Chapter XVI - The Tourist Industry 284
  • Chapter XVII - Public Health 300
  • Chapter XVIII - Education 317
  • Chapter XIX - Civic Employment 336
  • Chapter XX - Culture Changes and The Population Problem 351
  • Chapter XXI - Migration 366
  • Chapter XXII - Where Now? 382
  • Index 405
  • About the Author 417
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 420

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.