Transformation: The Story of Modern Puerto Rico

By Earl Parker Hanson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
Reconstruction

I BECAME IDENTIFIED with the New Deal in 1934. Previously I had spent one and a half years on a scientific mission in all parts of the Amazon basin and the Andes of northern South America--usually alone. On my field radio--needed for checking my chronometers--I had heard all the speeches of the 1932 presidential campaign, as well as a constant, unvarying stream of dramatic reports on riots and strikes, more riots, more strikes, farmers' concerted actions to forestall mortgage foreclosures, the growth of shacktowns everywhere, hunger marches, veterans' marches, the great Battle of Anacostia Flats, and the organized sale of unemployed apples on the streets of New York as a means of restoring public confidence in the nation's imminent prosperity. From my shifting vantage points in the Amazon jungles and the Andes of northern South America, the United States had seemed chaotic and on the verge of collapse. Alone for the better part of eighteen months, I had enjoyed the great boon of having opportunity and time to think. I became determined to get into things on my return, to participate in the affairs of my country.

Morris Llewellyn Cooke hired me for his Mississippi Valley Committee, and I learned something about the aims and techniques of sound governmental planning--as a means toward

-135-

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Transformation: The Story of Modern Puerto Rico
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Right Shall Again Prevail v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xv
  • Chapter I - Transformation 1
  • Chapter II - The Colony 21
  • Chapter III - The Anguish of Colonialism 40
  • Chapter IV - Colonialism Bankrupt 61
  • Chapter V - Tragic Lunacy 77
  • Chapter VI - Growth of a Leader 94
  • Chapter VII - Lobbyist 116
  • Chapter VIII - Reconstruction 135
  • Chapter IX - Disintegration 152
  • Chapter X - 1940 172
  • Chapter XI - Tugwell 190
  • Chapter XIII - Neither Radical nor Conservative 227
  • Chapter XV - Power and Industry 266
  • Chapter XVI - The Tourist Industry 284
  • Chapter XVII - Public Health 300
  • Chapter XVIII - Education 317
  • Chapter XIX - Civic Employment 336
  • Chapter XX - Culture Changes and The Population Problem 351
  • Chapter XXI - Migration 366
  • Chapter XXII - Where Now? 382
  • Index 405
  • About the Author 417
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