Distant Magnets: Expectations and Realities in the Immigrant Experience, 1840-1930

By Dirk Hoerder; Horst Rössler | Go to book overview

least -- escape the regional delicacy. If some Jewish and Italian migrants went to Paris seeking revolutionary France, some Auvergnats or Limousins left home to avoid the consequences of the land-splitting Napoleonic laws. Jews from tsarist Russia and (particularly later, anti-Fascist) Italians sought the political and civil freedom that the French provincials already had. But the latter joined the former in search of a personal emancipation from the watchful eyes of the village square. We have only hints of puckered disapproval on the part of those who remained home, or of disappointments on the part of those who arrived. But if migration is almost always an a posteriori success, the ambiguities of apprehension and adventure should not be underestimated.


Notes
1.
See, for example, Robert Foerster classic, The Italian Emigration of Our Times (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1919); John Briggs , An Italian Passage: Immigrants to Three American Cities, 1890-1930 (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1978); Samuel L. Baily, "The Adjustment of Italian Immigrants in Buenos Aires and New York, 18701914", American Historical Review 88 ( April 1983): 281-305; Herbert S. Klein , "The Integration of Italian Immigrants into the United States and Argentina: A Comparative Analysis", American Historical Review 88 ( April 1983): 306-29 and comments, 330-46.
2.
See Martin Nadaud, Les Mémoires de Léonard, ancien garçon maçon (Paris: Librairie Charles Delagrave, 1912); David Pinkney, "Migrations to Paris during the Second Empire", Journal of Modern History 25 ( March 1953): 5; Philippe Ariès, Histoire de la population française et leurs attitudes devant la vie depuis le XVIIIe siècle (Paris: Editions Self, 1948), 319.
3.
See Pinkney, "Migrations to Paris", 2; Maurice Agulhon, Gabriel Desert , and Robert Specklin, eds., Apogée et crise de la civilisation paysanne, vol. 3, in Histoire de la France rurale, ed. Georges Duby (Paris: Seuil, 1976), 222-23; Daniel Courgeau, Study of the Dynamics, Evolution, and Consequences of Migrations: Three Centuries of Spatial Mobility in France (Paris: Unesco, 1982), 26-27, 30: Ariès, Histoire de la population française,320. The 63 percent non-Parisian born obviously included foreign immigrants, but in 1881 their numbers were still small.
4.
Quoted in Pinkney, "Migrations to Paris", 12.
5.
See Françoise Raison-Jourde, La Colonie auvergnate de Paris au XIX siècle (Paris: Ville de Paris, Commission des travaux historiques, 1976), 87.
6.
See Pinkney, "Migrations to Paris", 8.

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Distant Magnets: Expectations and Realities in the Immigrant Experience, 1840-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.