Distant Magnets: Expectations and Realities in the Immigrant Experience, 1840-1930

By Dirk Hoerder; Horst Rössler | Go to book overview

8
Hungarian Images of America: The Sirens' Song of Tinkling Dollars

Julianna Puskás

SINCE the 1970s, the history of mass overseas migration has received considerable attention from East-Central European historians, with a number of studies and monographs tracing the process of migration and its causes, and even dealing with the American experiences of the immigrants. What has been less discussed, however, is the image of America that prevailed in the delivering communities, and how this image was shaped. Did the experience of the migrants bear out the hopes and expectations they had about America? What changes did this image of the United States undergo over the years?

The failure to deal with these issues has been due not so much to a lack of interest in them but rather to the difficulties involved in collecting the evidence on which to base a satisfactory answer. This is the type of difficulty to which Ingrid Semmingsen alludes in her study "Emigration and the Image of America in Europe." One of the chief impediments to an analysis of this image is "that impulses from without are assimilated by and within the human mind; such assimilation cannot be catalogued and only rarely leaves traces on documents." 1 For the most part we must rely on indirect sources for even approximate answers when dealing with questions of this kind. A further methodological difficulty is how to assemble our bits and pieces of information into a mosaic that gives a picture that is typical and yet colorful enough to do justice to the uniqueness of individual experience.

Our ability to reconstruct the picture is complicated by the limited availability of sources concerning certain countries and ethnic groups. In Hungary, for instance, very few "letters from America"

-180-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Distant Magnets: Expectations and Realities in the Immigrant Experience, 1840-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.