Distant Magnets: Expectations and Realities in the Immigrant Experience, 1840-1930

By Dirk Hoerder; Horst Rössler | Go to book overview

about it either"; "I do not praise it here. . . nor do I put it down," wrote the immigrants about America and their lives here at the beginning of the century. 55 And a similar equivocal evaluation, in which satisfaction and sorrow were inextricably mingled, was expressed in a poem about America published at the same time in an immigrant foreign-language newspaper, each stanza ending with the same refrain: "Avoid too much praise, do not criticize too much, wherever roses grow, you will also find thorns." 56


Notes
1
On the dependent or peripheral character of Eastern Europe's economic capitalist transformation at the turn of the century, see Ivan Berend and Gyorgi Ranki, Economic Development of East Central Europe in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries ( New York, 1974), and, by the same authors, The European Periphery and Industrialization, 1780-1914 ( New York, 1982). See also Alexander Gerschenkron, Economic Backwardness in Historical Perspective ( New York, 1965); Immanuel Wallerstein, The Modern WorldSystem ( New York, 1980), vol. 2, chaps. 5 and 6; and Daniel Chirot, Social Change in the Modern Era ( New York, 1986).
2
See Berend and Ranki, Economic Development of East Central Europe, 118-20, 128-36; The European Periphery and Industrialization, 25, 144- 57; Chirot, Social Change in the Modern Era, 87; C. Trebilcock, The Industrialization of Continental Powers, 1878-1914 ( New York, 1981), 233-35, 351- 59; Vladimir Dedijer et al., History of Yugoslavia ( New York, 1974), 358-63; Ivan Berend and Gyorgi Ranki, Hungary: A Century of Economic Development ( New York, 1974), 62-63; Jerzy Topolski, ed., Dzieje Polski ( Warsaw, 1978), 160-61; Zanna Kormanowa and Irena Pietrzak-Pawtowska, eds., Historia Polski, vol. 3, pt. 1 ( Warsaw, 1963), 217-21, 406, 641-52; Jan Sveton, Obyvatel'stvo Slovenska za Kapitalizmu ( Bratislava, 1958), 185-87.
3
See Berend and Ranki, Economic Development of East Central Europe, 135-37; The European Periphery and Industrializatoin, 25, 159; Chirot, Social Change in the Modern Era, 102-3.
4
The data on demographic growth are from Jerome Blum, The End of the Old Order in Rural Europe ( Princeton, N.J., 1978), 418; on the segmentation of peasant landholdings and the rural proletariat, data are from Ewa Morawska , For Bread with Butter: Life-Worlds of East Central Europeans in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, 1890-1940 ( Cambridge and New York, 1985), 26- 27, Table 1.1: "Distribution of Gainfully Occupied Population and Peasant Landownership in East Central Europe around 1900."
5
Compiled from Sveton, Obyvatel'stvo Slovenska, 72-73; B. Il'ko,

-259-

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