Distant Magnets: Expectations and Realities in the Immigrant Experience, 1840-1930

By Dirk Hoerder; Horst Rössler | Go to book overview

12
Paddy's Paradox: Emigration to America in Irish Imagination and Rhetoric

Kerby A. Miller

THE title of this essay, Paddy's Paradox (or, if you prefer, "Caitlin's Conundrum," since half the post-Famine migrants were women), reflects the remarkable discrepancies between the objective realities of Irish migration to the United States (especially in the post-Famine period, 1856-1921, when most departures occurred) and the popular interpretations of the exodus and the perceptions of America that prevailed in rural Ireland, especially -- but by no means exclusively -- among Irish-speakers in the western counties. 1

On one hand, for example, the vast majority of Irish Catholic migrants left home for essentially mundane reasons similar or identical to those that produced mass migration from other European countries: crop failures, falling agricultural prices, and, most important, the increasing redundancy of petty farmers, farmers' children, and agricultural laborers that had been brought about by the dynamics of agrarian and industrial capitalism-more specifically, by the decline in cottage industries and by the shift from subsistence to commercial agriculture, which, in Ireland, entailed the consolidation of holdings, the conversion of tillage to pasture, the introduction of labor-saving farm machinery, and the adoption of impartible inheritance and the dowry system by farmers and peasants alike. Thus, although Irish Catholics often blamed landlordism or the British government for migration and its causes, many of the most compelling, immediate reasons for migration (especially during the post

-264-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Distant Magnets: Expectations and Realities in the Immigrant Experience, 1840-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.