Hitler's Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness

By Konnilyn G. Feig | Go to book overview

CAMP NAMES AND LOCATIONS
The areas in which the camps were located changed hands over the course of the first half of this century. When these areas came under German control before and during World War II, the boundaries within Europe were once again redefined. The Germans divided the newly acquired territories into districts of the Third Reich and gave the areas and the camps they built there German names.Often, a camp was simply given the German name for the neighboring town or village. Today, many of the camps have become commonly known by their German names (though use of either name is accepted), while names of the areas in which they were located and the towns near which they were situated have reverted back to their original forms.The reader may be confused by the fact that the camps are referred to by both their German names and their native language names (e.g., Polish, Czech, French). The publishers hope that this glossary will serve as a guide in clarifying any inconsistencies within the text.Below the entry for each camp, the reader will find the nearest town or village as well as the status of that community before the war. During the war, the areas referred to were divided into several major classifications, based on the status awarded them by the Reich. Germany "liberated," annexed, incorporated, or occupied the areas; and the category dictated the kind of German rule imposed.To clarify current alignment, the province and country under whose jurisdiction each area presently falls has been given as well./ = also known as ( ) = name in other language, usually native one GDR = German Democratic Republic (East Germany) GFR = German Federal Republic ( West Germany)
Auschwitz (Polish: Oswiecim)
near town of Oswiecim, Poland
incorporated into district of Upper Silesia under German Reich

-xiii-

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Hitler's Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Camp Names and Locations xiii
  • Preface xix
  • Part One - A Beginning 1
  • Part Two - The Camps 41
  • The Pre-War Camps - Dachau: a Perfect Model 43
  • The Polish Camps 191
  • The German Camps 209
  • The Czechoslovakian Center 234
  • The Killing Centersexclusive Function Camps 266
  • The Labor/ Extermination Complexes 313
  • Liberation 370
  • Poland 394
  • Part Three - The Indifferent the Slaughterérs the Strugglers 405
  • Appendix I - Camp Directions 447
  • Appendix II - The Camps and Commandants 451
  • Appendix III - The Fate of the Commandants 455
  • Notes 461
  • Sources 503
  • Bibliography 506
  • Index 533
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