Hitler's Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness

By Konnilyn G. Feig | Go to book overview

NOTES

PREFACE
1.
Elie Wiesel in Alvin Rosenfeld and Irving Greenberg, eds., Confronting the Holocaust ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1978), 12, 21.
2.
George Steiner, In Bluebeard's Castle ( New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1971), eloquently insists upon confronting "dark places." Quotes from Isaiah Trunk, Jewish Responses to Nazi Persecution ( New York: Stein and Day, 1979), 111.
3.
Elie Wiesel in Rosenfeld and Greenberg, Confronting the Holocaust, 200.
4.
Elie Wiesel in Harry James Cargas, ed., Responses to Elie Wiesel ( New York: Persea, 1978), 15.
5.
Silvano Arieti, The Parnas ( New York: Basic Books, 1979), 85.
6.
K. Feig, The Voyage of the Damned. An Essayed Bibliography ( Portland: University of Maine, 1974). One can never express enough thanks for Raul Hilberg The Destruction of the European Jews ( Chicago: Quadrangle, 1967); Lucy Dawidowicz The War Against the Jews ( New York: Holt, 1975); and Nora Levin The Holocaust ( New York: Schocken, 1973).
7.
Nellie Sachs, O The Chimneys ( New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 1967), 59.

PART ONE
THE BEGINNING
1.
' Olokauston is the Greek translation from the Hebrew Bible of the word for Olah. Quote from Terrence Des Pres, The Survivor ( New York: Oxford, 1976), 49. See also Gerd Korman , Hunter and Hunted ( New York: Viking, 1973), 250. One must only apply the word Holocaust to the mass murder of six million Jews, insists Yehuda Bauer. I agree. In his book, The Holocaust in Historical Perspective ( Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1978), Bauer warns against using the term for all unfortunate occurrences. The Jews alone were singled out for total destruction. "For the first time in history, a sentence of death had been pronounced on anyone guilty of having been born, and born of certain parents" (p. 32). Hitler intended genocide against the Poles and Russians. But a difference exists between "forcible, even murderous, denationalization, and wholesale, total murder of every one of the members of a community" (p. 35). The Holocaust most closely parallels the Armenian massacre by the Turks. The Turks, however, were neither total nor logical in their approach, and Armenians in the center of the empire were allowed to live (p. 37). Bauer says that since World War II there have been several genocides and some near holocausts, and the victims of both suffer the same (I do not

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Hitler's Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Camp Names and Locations xiii
  • Preface xix
  • Part One - A Beginning 1
  • Part Two - The Camps 41
  • The Pre-War Camps - Dachau: a Perfect Model 43
  • The Polish Camps 191
  • The German Camps 209
  • The Czechoslovakian Center 234
  • The Killing Centersexclusive Function Camps 266
  • The Labor/ Extermination Complexes 313
  • Liberation 370
  • Poland 394
  • Part Three - The Indifferent the Slaughterérs the Strugglers 405
  • Appendix I - Camp Directions 447
  • Appendix II - The Camps and Commandants 451
  • Appendix III - The Fate of the Commandants 455
  • Notes 461
  • Sources 503
  • Bibliography 506
  • Index 533
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