Affective Neuroscience: The Foundations of Human and Animal Emotions

By Jaak Panksepp | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1.
Watson, J. B. ( 1924). Psychology from the standpoint of a behaviorist. Philadelphia: Lippincott.
2.
Skinner, B. F. ( 1938). The behavior of organisms. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.
3.
Gardner, H. ( 1985). The mind's new science: A history of the cognitive revolution. New York: Basic Books.
4.
Barklow, J., Cosmides, L., & Tooby, J. (eds.) ( 1992). The adapted mind: Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture. New York: Oxford Univ. Press.
5.
A great number of writers have addressed this issue from different perspectives, and many key articles can be found in annual updates of Advances in Animal Behavior. Works that cover most of the critical issues are:

Hogan, J. A., & Roper, T. J. ( 1978). A comparison of the properties of different reinforcers. Adv. Anim. Behav. 8:155-255.

Marler, P., & Terrace, H. S. (eds.) ( 1984). The biology of learning. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.

Sherry, D. F., & Schacter, D. L. ( 1987). The evolution of multiple memory systems. Psych. Rev. 94:434- 454.

6.
Breland, K., & Breland, M. ( 1961). The misbehavior of organisms. Am. Psychol. 16:681-684.
7.
Seligman, M. E. P., & Hager, J. L. (eds.) ( 1972). Biological boundaries of learning. New York: Appleton.
8.
Panksepp, J. ( 1990). Psychology's search for identity: Can "mind" and behavior be understood without understanding the brain? New Ideas Psychol. 8:139-149.
9.
Skinner, B. F. ( 1987). Whatever happened to psychology as the science of behavior? Am. Psychol. 42:780-786.
10.
Plutchik, R. ( 1994). The psychology and biology of emotions. New York: HarperCollins College.
11.
Lewis, M., & Haviland, J. M. (eds.) ( 1993). Handbook of emotions. New York: Guilford Press.
12.
Wright, R. ( 1994). The moral animal. New York: Pantheon.
13.
Two texts that cover most of the key issues are: Posner, M. I., & Raichle, M. E. ( 1994). Images of mind. New York: Scientific American Library.

Roland, P. E. ( 1993). Brain activation. New York: Wiley-Liss.

14.
Wright, R. ( 1995). The biology of violence. New Yorker (March 13).

Brain, P. F., & Haug, M. ( 1992). Hormonal and neurochemical correlates of various forms of animal "aggression." Psychoneuroendocrinol. 17:537-551.

15.
One of the easiest ways to increase aggression is to precipitate withdrawal in opiate-addicted animals. See: Reiss, A., Miczek, K., & Roth, J. (eds.) ( 1994). Understanding and preventing violence. Vol. 2, Biobehavioral influences. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Brain opioids constitute a powerful antiaggressive system of the brain. See: Shaikh, M. B., Lu, C.-L., & Siegel, A. ( 1991). An enkephalinergic mechanism involved in amygdaloid suppression of affective defense behavior elicited from the midbrain periaqueductal gray in the cat. Brain Res. 559:109-117.

16.
For current research and views on genetic dispositions in aggression, see: Special issue: The neurobehavioral genetics of aggression. Behav. Genetics 26:459-432.

For an overview of other biological controls, see: Marzuk, P. A. ( 1996). Violence, crime, and mental illness: How strong a link? Arch. Gen. Psychiat. 53:481- 486.

17.
Bouchard, T. J. ( 1994). Genes, environment, and personality. Science 264: 1700-1701.

Bouchard, T. J., Lykken, D. T.; McGue, M.: Segal, N. L. ; & Tellegen, A. ( 1990). Sources of human psychological differences: The Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart. Science 250:223-228.

18.
Merzenich, M. M., & Sameshima, K. ( 1993). Cortical plasticity and memory. Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 3:187-196.

Nudo, R. J., Milliken, G. W., Jenkins, W. M., & Merzenich, M. M. ( 1996). Use-dependent alterations of movement representations in primary motor cortex of adult squirrel monkeys. J. Neurosci. 16:785- 807.

19.
Elbert, T., Pantev, C., Wienbruch, C., Rockstroh, B. , & Taub, E. ( 1995). Increased cortical representation of the fingers of the left hand in string players. Science 270:305-307.
20.
Panksepp, J. ( 1985). Mood changes. In Handbook of clinical neurology. Vol. 1, Clinical neuropsychology

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