Evangelical Theories of Biblical Inspiration: A Review and Proposal

By Kern Robert Trembath | Go to book overview

1
Deductivist Theories of Biblical Inspiration

In this chapter I shall examine four theories of biblical inspiration. They are related by a common method or approach, which may be called a deductivist approach. A deductivist approach is one that reflects the understanding that knowledge is grounded upon beliefs which are not subject to empirical verification but nevertheless guide or influence empirical observations. Such beliefs are often uncritically held; persons holding them assume them without examining them. In addition, and probably because they are never critically inspected, these beliefs are taken to be inviolable. They therefore shape and influence major portions of mental and empirical activity but remain impervious to influence themselves. Since such beliefs logically antedate all mental and empirical activity according to this approach, it is also referred to as an a priori scheme of knowledge. I shall use these two terms interchangeably.

In general, deductivist approaches to biblical inspiration begin by discussing and formulating a doctrine of God. Since a part of any doctrine of God is that God cannot lie or deceive, anything said to be "the word of God" must (ex hypothesi) be the truth. The Bible has been called the word of God, and thus it too has been taken to be "the truth." A deductivist theory of biblical inspiration must explain how the books of the Bible, which at least appear to be like many other books, can be called the word of God in such a way that their complete truthfulness is ensured. The genius of a deductivist approach to inspiration lies in its confession of the cause-and-effect relationship between the character of God and the truthfulness of the Bible. This is what William Abraham means when he says, "A deductive type of theory begins with a basic theological claim about the meaning of inspiration and attempts to deduce from this what Scripture must be or contain."1 The a priori element in this approach is the content of both the doctrine of God and the doctrine of inspiration, which is determined independent of any human

-8-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Evangelical Theories of Biblical Inspiration: A Review and Proposal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Deductivist Theories of Biblical Inspiration 8
  • 2 - Inductivist Theories of Biblical Inspiration 47
  • 3 - Inspiration and the Human Recipient 72
  • 4 - Inspiration and the Means 87
  • 5 - God as the Initiator of Inspiration 104
  • Notes 119
  • Bibliography 143
  • Name Index 151
  • Subject Index 153
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 154

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.