Recorded Music in American Life: The Phonograph and Popular Memory, 1890-1945

By William Howland Kenney | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction
1.
In America, "phonograph," a trademark term referring to Edison's cylinder, came to describe all sound-recording and playback machines. In England, the preferred term came to be "gramophone," Emil Berliner's trade name for his disc invention.
2.
Roland Gelatt, The Fabulous Phonograph: From Edison to Stereo, rev. ed. ( N.Y.: Appleton Century, 1965), 151, 189, 305; Andre Millard, America on Record: A History of Recorded Sound ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), 5. The publication of this book brings yet further attention to the industrial and technological dimensions of phonograph studies. Michael Chanan , Repeated Takes: A Short History of Recording and Its Effects on Music ( London: Verso, 1995) ably summarizes the technological impact.
3.
Philip H. Ennis, The Seventh Stream: The Emergence of Rocknroll in American Popular Music ( Hanover, N.H.: Wesleyan University Press, 1992), the best scholarly analysis of the "rocknroll" revolution.
4.
Carlton Mabee, The American Leonardo: A Life of Samuel F. B. Morse ( N.Y.: Knopf, 1943); Steven Lubar, Infoculture: The Smithsonian Book of Information Age Inventions ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1993), 73-117.
5.
Claude S. Fischer, America Calling: A Social History of the Telephone to 1940 ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992).
6.
J. Fred MacDonald, Don't Touch that Dial: Radio Programming in American Life from 1920 to 1960 ( Chicago: Nelson-Hall, 1979). Daniel J. Czitrom, Media and the American Mind from Morse to McLuhan (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1982) analyzes both movies and radio but omits the phonograph. Susan Douglas, Inventing American Broadcasting, 1899- 1922 ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987).
7.
Lary May, Screening Out the Past: The Birth of Mass Culture and the Motion Picture Industry ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1980).
8.
John B. Rae, The American Automobile ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1965); James Flink, The Car Culture ( Cambridge: MIT Press, 1975).
9.
Millard, America on Record, ch. 8.
10.
See, for example, Oliver Read and Walter L. Welch, From Tin Foil to Stereo: The Evolution of the Phonograph ( Indianapolis: Howard Sams, 1977) and its drastically revised edition, Walter L. Welch and Leah Brodbeck

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