Religion and the American Civil War

By Randall M. Miller; Harry S. Stout et al. | Go to book overview

5
The Coming of the Lord The Northern Protestant Clergy and the Civil War Crisis

GEORGE M. FREDRICKSON

On April 14, 1865, a large crowd of Union partisans gathered in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina, to celebrate the return of the American flag to its prewar position atop the battlements of Fort Sumter. The featured speaker at this most important and richly symbolic of northern victory ceremonies was the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, pastor of the Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, New York. The choice of Beecher to be the orator of the day was a recognition of his personal services to the Union cause and those of the profession to which he belonged--the clergy of the principal northern Protestant denominations. 1

The proper role of Protestant ministers and their churches in American public life has been a contentious issue since the founding of the republic. The generally accepted principle of separation of church and state has been interpreted in one way by those who (following the secular libertarian tradition of Thomas Jefferson) have viewed religious fervor as a potential danger to freedom of thought that requires a high wall of separation to protect government from sectarian influences, and in another by those who have made a distinction between the establishment of a national church, which was admittedly unconstitutional and unAmerican, and governmental endorsement of the common beliefs and values of the major Protestant denominations. Those advocating an offical recognition of mainstream Protestantism as America's faith have generally tried to give the sanction of law and public authority to cultural practices and moral standards that were not shared by religious (or nonreligious) minorities.

During the Jacksonian period, between the 1820s and the 1840s, the high-

-110-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion and the American Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 434

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.