Religion and the American Civil War

By Randall M. Miller; Harry S. Stout et al. | Go to book overview

dynamic institution of the black community in freedom. If this was the most profound change, however, it was far from the only change. Nearly a decade ago the historian Maris Vinovskis asked: "Have Social Historians Lost the Civil War?" His answer was yes, but thanks in part to his efforts they have begun to find it. Until now, the religious history of the war still seemed to be lost. With the stimulus provided by this book, however, historians should begin to find it as well. Religion was central to the meaning of the Civil War, as the generation that experienced the war tried to understand it. Religion should also be central to our efforts to recover that meaning.


Notes
1.
James West Smith, diary entry of May 29, 1863, in "A Confederate Soldier's Diary: Vicksburg in 1863," Southwest Review 28 ( 1943): 296.
2.
"Allen Jordan to parents, June 5, 1862", in "The Thomas G. Jordan Family During the War Between States," Georgia Historical Quarterly 59 ( 1975): 135; Amos Steere to Lucy Steere, May 2, 1862, Steere Papers, Lewis Leigh Collection, U.S. Army Military History Institute, Carlisle, PA; Frederick Pettit to sister, June 1, 1864, Pettit Papers, U.S. Army Military History Institute.
3.
Roy P. Basler, ed., The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln ( New Brunswick, 1953-1955), 6: 496-497, 7: 21.
4.
A. Fisk Gore to Katie Gore, May 9, 1862, Gore Papers, Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis; Robert Bowlin to father, March 15, 1863, Bowlin Papers, in private possession; William F. Benjamin to sister, June 10, 1864, Benjamin Papers, U.S. Army Military History Institute.
5.
William H. Martin to Elizabeth Martin, April 1, 1864, Martin Papers, U.S. Army Military History Institute; "Mathew Andrew Dunn to wife, July 6, 1846", in "Mathew Andrew Dunn Letters," ed. Weymouth T. Jordan, Journal of Mississippi History 1 ( 1939): 199; Stephen P. Chase Diary, entry of March 31, 1864, U.S. Army Military History Institute.
6.
William Martin to "Friend," undated, 1861, Civil War Collection, Missouri Historical Society; "George W. Lennard to Clara Lennard, December 31, 1864", in "'Give Yourself No Trouble About Me': The Shiloh letters of George W. Lennard," eds. Paul Hubbard and Christine Lews, Indiana Magazine of History 76 ( 1980): 26.
7.
"Winston Stephens to Octavia Stephens, March 16, 1863", in "'Rogues and Black Hearted Scamps': Civil War Utters of Winston and Octavia Stephens, 1861-1863," eds. Ellen E. Hodges and Stephen Kerber, Florida Historical Quarterly 57 ( 1978): 82; "Stoughton H. Dent to wife, February 6, 1863", in Ray Mathis, ed., In the Land of the Living: Wartime Letters by Confederates from the Chattahoochee Valley of Alabama and Georgia ( Troy, AL, 1981), 62.
8.
"Jacob Heffelfinger to Jennie Heffelfinger, February 27, 1862", in "'Dear Sister Jennie' 'Dear Brother Jacob': Correspondence Between a Northern Soldier and His Sister," ed. Florence C. McLaughlin, Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine 60 ( 1977): 127; William H. Walling to sisters, May 29, 1862, Walling Papers, in private possession.

-412-

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