Religion & the Order of Nature

By Seyyed Hossein Nasr | Go to book overview

3
Philosophy and the Misdeeds of Philosophy

Wisdom is possession of that Truth whose radiance
Crowns our life, our knowledge, our existence,
Its love, true philosophy as it has always been,
Casting the light of certitude upon earthly doubts.
How strange that the hate of that sophia, divine,
Neglect of her beauty and Truth Itself,
Also parade as philosophy in these days,
Forgetful of all that is within, yet claiming to be
Our guide in this our earthly journey.
And we in need of that light supernal,
Shining forth from the Source of all reality,
Above, and within the substance of our being
.

It is now for us to consider the role of philosophy in the understanding of the order of nature. Our comments in this chapter will be limited to the West because it was here that a rebellion took place against traditional philosophy, which had remained inalienably linked to religion everywhere and in all stages of premodern history save for a brief period in Greco-Roman antiquity. This rebellion resulted in a new chapter in the history of Western philosophy wherein much of philosophy set itself against the very principles of religion and even wisdom. Only in the West did a philosophy develop that was not only no longer the love of wisdom but went so far as to deny the very category of wisdom as a legitimate form of knowledge. The result was a hatred of wisdom that should more appropriately be called "misosophy" (literally hatred of sophia, wisdom) rather than philosophy.

In both Greek antiquity and the European Middle Ages, Western philosophy possessed schools that could be compared with the great intellectual traditions of China and India, not to speak of the Islamic world, which shared much of the

-80-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion & the Order of Nature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Religion and Religions 9
  • Notes 25
  • 2 - The Order of Nature 29
  • Notes 66
  • 3 - Philosophy and the Misdeeds of Philosophy 80
  • Greek Philosophy 113
  • 4 - The Traditional Sciences, the Scientific Revolution, and Its Aftermath 126
  • Notes 153
  • 5 - The Tragic Consequences of Humanism in the West 163
  • Notes 185
  • 6 - The Rediscovery of Nature: Religion and the Environmental Crisis 191
  • Notes 223
  • 7 - The Wisdom of the Body 235
  • Notes 262
  • Religion and the Resacralization of Nature 270
  • Notes 289
  • Index 293
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.