Chapter Five

AMERICANs who before the war knew East Anglia from the North Sea just south of Scotland down to the Channel ports would hardly recognize it today. The face of this part of England has been completely changed by American Army engineers and engineer troops. In the space of a few months airdromes were built at phenomenal speed for the use of a mounting tide of American-built bombers and fighter planes. Some airfields were also constructed for the British. Tremendous camouflaged depots were erected, some of them almost overnight. Farms, wooded areas, and even villages were taken over to provide the land for these installations.

It was early January, when the English dark remained until nine o'clock in the morning and returned at four- thirty in the afternoon. Our first stop after leaving London was at an airdrome under construction. Colonel Thompson, the commanding officer, and the mixed staff of Negro and white officers drove their men at an unbelievable pace. Such speed was necessary. The Germans had resumed their almost nightly bombing of London and of the cast coast of England shortly after I reached London. It had been stepped up to a furious pace in an effort to postpone as long as possible the invasion of the Continent. British and American

-44-

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A Rising Wind
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Chapter One 11
  • Chapter Two 15
  • Chapter Three 26
  • Chapter Four 35
  • Chapter Five 44
  • Chapter Six 56
  • Chapter Seven 68
  • Chapter Eight 78
  • Chapter Nine 84
  • Chapter Ten 97
  • Chapter Eleven 103
  • Chapter Twelve 123
  • Chapter Thirteen 142
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