Chapter Thirteen

REPERCUSSIONS of greater or lesser degree upon several groups will develop out of the manner in which the racial question has been handled by the United States during the war. These will manifest themselves in all parts of the world during the months immediately after the armistice and in the years which follow.

Most direct, of course, will be the effect upon the Negro soldier himself. Taught from early childhood at home and in school the stirring traditions of the United States and, like his white fellow American, taught by every means of education and propaganda to admire those who fought for freedom, he had, however, become conditioned, on leaving school, to discrimination. World War II has immeasurably magnified the Negro's awareness of the disparity between the American profession and practice of democracy. He has learned to listen cynically to Winston Churchill's "blood, sweat, and tears" oratory while India remains enslaved, maligned by British propaganda, and its leaders jailed.

The news that the American Negro soldier has received from back home has been predominantly disheartening. He has heard through letters, newspaper clippings, and from more recent arrivals of the continuation of the humiliation,

-142-

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A Rising Wind
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Chapter One 11
  • Chapter Two 15
  • Chapter Three 26
  • Chapter Four 35
  • Chapter Five 44
  • Chapter Six 56
  • Chapter Seven 68
  • Chapter Eight 78
  • Chapter Nine 84
  • Chapter Ten 97
  • Chapter Eleven 103
  • Chapter Twelve 123
  • Chapter Thirteen 142
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