Oil Change: Perspectives on Corporate Transformation

By Art Kleiner; George Roth et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This is the second volume in the Oxford University Press Learning History Library. In the first volume, Car Launch, we thanked the many people whose ideas and influences helped define the learning history form. In this volume, we wish to focus our thanks on the people who contributed to this book. Once again, managing editor Nina Kruschwitz is responsible for the design and production of the book -- overseeing editorial work, creating graphics and diagrams, and organizing the layout and production process on the authors' end. She played an enormous role in helping the critical messages of the OilCo story shine through the complexities of detail and dialogue.

Ken MacLeod, academic editor at Oxford University Press, developed the prototype for this volume and worked with us to define and develop Oil Change. Others at Oxford University Press who deserve credit include: Peter Ban, editorial design manager Elyse Dubin, and Oxford University Press marketers Scott Burns and Sally James. Literary agent Joseph Spieler managed the contractual underpinning for the book; Helen Basilesco of the Ford/MIT Collaboration, where George Roth is executive director, provided valuable support, as did Maggie Piper of the Fieldbook Project.

Ordinarily, we would effusively and gratefully acknowledge our colleagues at OilCo by name -- the people who commissioned the learning history, who coauthored and coedited the document, who designed the workshops in which OilCo people talked about it, who championed it at all levels of the organization, who "midwifed" the process that allowed it to be publically available, and whose comments provided the substance from which we drew our intellectual understanding. We would also thank the OilCo executives who recognized the value of this document and who gave approval and support for its general release. We would especially acknowledge the OilCo employees, managers, and executives who permitted themselves to be interviewed and painstakingly made sure their

-xxiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oil Change: Perspectives on Corporate Transformation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 235

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.