Oil Change: Perspectives on Corporate Transformation

By Art Kleiner; George Roth et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11

THE DIVERSITY CORPORATE
INITIATIVE TEAM

A variety of cross-functional teams have been organized since the beginning of transformation. They include operational improvement teams, community service projects, and eight Future Imperatives teams, which report directly to the Executive Council. These last teams -- six in 1994 1995, and two in 1995-1996 -- have been charged with developing approaches to critical strategic concerns for the company as a system.

The initiative teams came together as relative strangers. They figured out their own mandate. They gained confidence as they discovered that they had a significant task ahead of them. They muddled through the evolution of that insight, and then crystallized into understanding when they had a chance to look outside OilCo's traditional boundaries -- in part by going to other companies. Finally, when they came back together, they faced inordinately tough deadlines and an uncertain fate: How should they present their material? What was their authority? And what would the aftermath be?

At OilCo, most of the teams had their formal task end at that point. Nonetheless, most of them found themselves feeling committed, in one way or another, to help follow up with the implementation of their recommendations. This comment comes from a staff member who was not on an initiative team, but who observed them first from a location outside Los Angeles, and later worked closely with one of the teams.

Could this be a model for other types of teams throughout OilCo?

MEMBER, CORPORATE STAFF: The initiative teams were different from ordinary company practice. It looked like senior managers would have to come across with specific recommendations about how to run the businesses. It was

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oil Change: Perspectives on Corporate Transformation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 235

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.