Advances in Input-Output Analysis: Technology, Planning, and Development

By William Peterson | Go to book overview
data can be applied in a wide variety of statistical environments. Some relevant aspects of this environment are:
The nature and specification of the available basic data
The quantity and quality of the available manpower
The time available

In practice, statistical environments vary widely. On the one hand there are differences between different countries; on the other, there are differences in the completeness and detailed classification of data between recent and earlier years within countries.

Depending on the availability of basic information, manpower, and computer capacity, the compilation of make and use matrices must to a greater or lesser extent always involve assumptions. These assumptions may relate, for example, to the allocation of unspecified items and to the relation between input and output. Making these assumptions always leads to loss of detail, since the tendency is to use averages. In each statistical environment statisticians have to determine how much loss of detail they consider acceptable. More assumptions are allowed with provisional data than with definitive data.

The objective of the information to be obtained is also significant. If this objective is study of the input structure of industry groups or the composition of final expenditure, less reliance may be placed on the assumptions used than when the aim is estimates of the level, volume, or price changes of goods and services transactions in the context of the national accounts. Less loss of detail with use of assumptions can be expected if differences in price changes between various goods and services are taken into account. One condition for this is that there be sufficient relevant price information. The resulting disaggregation is, however, probably of a better quality than when disaggregation is carried out on the basis of nominal value data alone.


REFERENCES

Al, P. G., B. M. Balk, S. de Boer, and G. P. den Bakker. 1984. "The use of chain indices for deflating the national accounts." Study prepared by the Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics under contract with EUROSTAT, Voorburg, Netherlands.

Al, Pieter, and Guus Broesterhuizen. May 1985. "Comparability of input-output tables in time." Paper presented at International Meeting on Problems of Compilation of Input- Output Tables, Baden, Austria.

Algera, S. B., P. A. H. M. Mantelaers, and H. K. van Tuinen. 1982. "Problems in the compilation of input-output tables in the Netherlands." In J. Skolka (Ed.), Compilation of Input-Output Tables. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.

Broesterhuizen, Guus, 1984. "The unobserved economy and the National Accounts in the Netherlands: A sensitivity analysis." In W. Gaertner and A. Wenig (Eds.), The Economics of the Shadow Economy. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.

Central Bureau voor de Statiskiek. 1984. "Input-outputtabellen 1981 in prijzen van 1980." In De Produktiestructuur van de Nederlandse Volkshuishouding. Vol. 12. Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics, Voorburg, Netherlands.

Furunes, Nils Terje, and Svein Lusse Røgeberg. 1982. "Compilation of input-output tables in Norway." In J. Skolka (Ed.), Compilation of Input-Output Tables. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.

Thage, Bent. May 1985. "Balancing procedures in the detailed commodity flow system used as a basis for annual input output tables in Denmark." Paper presented at International Meeting on Problems of Compilation of Input-Output Tables, Baden, Austria.

United Nations. 1968. A System of National Accounts. Studies in methods series F, no. 2, Rev. 3. New York: United Nations.

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