Utah's History

By Thomas G. Alexander; Eugene E. Campbell et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

Utah's History began with a discussion early in the 1970s concerning the need for a substantial single-volume survey of the development of territory and state, based on recent research and written for adult readers. The discussants were David E. Miller of the University of Utah and Eugene E. Campbell and Thomas G. Alexander of Brigham Young University. Since none of the three wished to tackle the task alone, they decided to recruit associates-- fellow historians and in a few cases graduate students--to produce the components for a cooperative work. Miller accepted responsibility for the pre-1847 period, Campbell for the territorial years, and Alexander for the twentieth century.

As the chapters were written it seemed advisable that one person be given general editorial oversight so that the final product would not be an anthology of articles about Utah history but a volume sufficiently comprehensive and integrated to serve as a college-level text as well as a general-purpose narrative and reference work. Richard D. Poll of Western Illinois University was enlisted for this assignment. He is responsible for revising the individual chapters to varying degrees, recruiting several additional contributors, selecting the pictures and supervising the preparation of the maps and statistical tables, and working with the Brigham Young University Press on the design and production of the volume. The interpretive viewpoints of the chapter authors were in all cases preserved and the associate editors counseled with the authors and reviewed the sections for which they wrote introductory statements.

A challenge that confronted both authors and editors was to keep Utah's History from being just another volume of Mormon history.

-xvii-

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