Utah's History

By Thomas G. Alexander; Eugene E. Campbell et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
The Earliest Peoples

S. Lyman Tyler

To adjust the framework of the Utah story from geological time, it may be helpful to recall how brief is the written history of the area which became the state. Although Spain claimed the region for three centuries after Columbus and Cortez the vast expanses north of New Spain emerged from Indian lore only late in that period. The first record which precisely documents events in Utah--the journal of the Domínguez-Vélez de Escalante expedition--was written while signatures were still fresh on the American Declaration of Independence. Thus the history of Utah encompasses only the last half-century of Spanish possession, 27 years as a part of Mexico, and a little more than 125 years in the United States. Before 1850 Utah had no political limits or status, and Utah Territory did not shrink to the present state boundaries until 1868.

The story of man in Utah, however, goes back much farther than the written records. Indian cultures, identified through the work of anthropologists, archeologists, and historians as Desert, Basket Maker, Pueblo, Fremont, Ute, Paiute, Gosiute, Shoshoni, Navajo, and others, have been present in the Great Basin-Colorado Plateau region for about 10,000 years. Indian peoples had their own boundaries that separated the territory of one group from another, but these had no relationship to the present boundaries of Utah. (See map, p. 721.)


The Desert Culture

During the 1920s and 1930s archeologists began to report discoveries in the American Southwest that carried the story of man

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Utah's History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 764

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.