Utah's History

By Thomas G. Alexander; Eugene E. Campbell et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 11 Economic Beginnings

Dean L. May

In 1860 Brigham Young summarized the biases that had influenced his efforts to shape early Utah economy. "There is no happiness in gold," he told the Saints, "Not the least . . . . We have the real wealth here . . . . We have the good, fine flour, good wheat, horses, cattle, beef, vegetables, fruit, sheep, and wool, . . . This is real wealth. This people is a rich people." Young's preaching seems to have evoked the response he wished, as there were, in fact, marked differences between Utah's pattern of economic development and that of neighboring states. In the first decades of settlement the work forces of Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, and Montana were dominated by miners. During the same period fifty percent of Utah's workers were farmers, with only an insignificant handful engaged in mining. Typically, the other mountain states continued for two to four decades to put most of their manpower into extracting and processing minerals, not reaching, even in Idaho, the high ratios of agriculture to mining found in Utah. (See Tables, p. 714.)

Utah's economy developed differently from the economics of her neighbors for several reasons. Most importantly, initial white settlement was by an organized group of refugees seeking secure homes rather than quick wealth. Moreover, these Mormon settlers were motivated by a common ideology and set of loyalties that urged them to a relatively planned and balanced economic development and that stressed agriculture over mining and other pursuits as the basis for a sound economy. Brigham Young and other leaders wished to minimize outside trade, discouraging their followers from commercial and banking enterprises. They also opposed the

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Utah's History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 764

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.