Utah's History

By Thomas G. Alexander; Eugene E. Campbell et al. | Go to book overview

ing reservation land for white settlement. The ostensible purpose of the law was to break up the reservations and stop governmental dealings with the Indians as tribal units. If the policy had been a success, Indians would have eventually been dealt with as individual landholders and ultimately would have received citizenship and clear titles to their land tracts.

One basic problem was that most western Indians, including the Utes, were not farmers, and the application of the new policy did not please them. Another problem was that much of the reservation land was not readily adaptable to freehold farming. The implementation of the new program among the Utah Indians began as Utah won statehood in 1896, and its traumatic impact upon the Uintah-Ouray Reservation inhabitants is still being felt.


Chapter 19
Bibliographical Essay

Two published bibliographies, Omer C. Stewart Ethnohistorical Bibliography of the Ute Indians of Colorado ( 1971) and S. Lyman Ty ler's The Ute People: A Bibliographical Checklist ( 1964), include articles, government documents, and monographic studies pertaining to the Utes, Paiutes, and Gosiutes both before and after contact by European-Americans.

Readers are referred to titles by Joseph G. Jorgensen that contain information about the Northern Ute; to the special issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly, Spring 1971, devoted to Utah. Indians, with C. Gregory Crampton as guest editor; and to selections on the Indians in Helen Z. Papanikolas, ed., 'The Peoples of Utah ( 1976). See detailed citations following chapter 2.

Some of the earlier writers whose works contain significant material on the territorial period are Paul Bailey, whose Jacob Hamblin: Buckskin Apostle ( 1948) is still the basic biography for Hamblin; Leland H. Creer, "Federal Indian Policy, 1849-1865," Ltah and the Nation ( 1929); Milton R. Hunter, Brigham Young the Colonizer ( 1940); Daniel W. Jones, whose personal experiences are recorded in Forty Years Among the Indians ( 1890); and William R. Palmer, whose many articles on the "Southern Paiute" appeared in UHQ from the first volume in 1928 until the 1940s.

Coulsen and Geneva Wright deal with the last years of the territorial period in "Indian-White Relations in the Uintah Basin," Utah Humanities Review, 1948. See also Dale L. Morgan, "The Administration of Indian Affairs in Utah, 1851-1858," Pacific Historical Review, 1948; Omer C. Stewart, "Ute Indians: Before and After White Contact," UHQ 1966; and Gustive O. Larson, "BrighamYoung and the Indians,"

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