Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee 1901-1915

By Louis R. Harlan | Go to book overview

NOTES

A Note on the Notes

The principal source cited in these footnotes is the Booker T. Washington Papers in the Division of Manuscripts of the Library of Congress, a rich collection of approximately a million letters, speeches, reports, newspaper clippings, and other documents. All Unpublished sources and newspaper clippings cited in the footnotes without a place reference are from this collection. The Library of Congress has been engaged, since these notes were taken, in microfilming and rearranging the collection, and many of the items are now in different boxes from the ones in which I saw them. Occasionally, where a footnote cites two or more sources, the notation [ LC] is used to differentiate these materials. Researchers should seek the assistance of the staff of the Division of Manuscripts in locating items in the Booker T. Washington Papers.

All other manuscripts cited are identified as to place, " LC" standing for the Library of Congress. Among these other collections is a smaller but substantial Booker T. Washington collection in the archives of Tuskegee Institute.

The principal published source is Louis R. Harlan and Raymond W. Smock , eds., The Booker T. Washington Papers, 11 vols. to date ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1972- ). Documents in this source are cited as in BTW Papers, with volume and pages. Other published sources appear with full title at their first mention in any chapter and by short title thereafter.


Chapter 1
1.
Cleveland Plain Dealer, Nov 2, 1901, clipping.
2.
William Jennings Bryan, editorial in The Commoner quoted at length in Jackson Clarion-Ledger, Nov 5, 1901, clipping [ LC]. See also New York World, Nov 1, 1901.

-459-

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Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee 1901-1915
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Contents xv
  • Chapter 1 Partners of Convenience: Washington and Roosevelt 3
  • Chapter 2 Black Intellectuals and the Boston Riot 32
  • Chapter 3 Conference at Carnegie Hall 63
  • Chapter 4 Damming Niagara 84
  • Chapter 5 Family Matters 107
  • Chapter 6 Other People's Money 128
  • Chapter 7 Tuskegee's People 143
  • Chapter 8 Other People's Schools 174
  • Chapter 9 Up from Serfdom 202
  • Chapter 10 a White Man's Country 238
  • Chapter 11 Provincial Man of the World 266
  • Chapter 12 Atlanta and Brownsville 295
  • Chapter 13 Brownsville Ghouls 323
  • Chapter 14 Black Politics in the Taft Era 338
  • Chapter 15 Washington and the Rise of the Naacp 359
  • Chapter 16 Night of Violence 379
  • Chapter 17 Outside Looking In 405
  • Chapter 18 Gonna Lay Down My Burden 438
  • Notes 459
  • Index 529
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