Swing to Bop: An Oral History of the Transition in Jazz in the 1940s

By Ira Gitler | Go to book overview

5
California

A year later Gillespie would reform the big band and keep it together into early 1950. But in late 1945, it was back to the small- group format. Bird and Dizzy were reunited and left for California in December to play an engagement at Billy Berg's in Hollywood. Al Haig was the pianist, with Milt Jackson on vibes; Ray Brown, bass; and Stan Levey, drums. When Parker's attendance at the club became erratic, Gillespie was forced to hire Lucky Thompson to insure two horns in the front line.

The reception that Gillespie and Parker received from the public in California wasn't much better than Dizzy's big band got in the South. The difference here was the musicians, who had heard the New York recordings, came to hear their new idols in the flesh. These were the young musicians, but the older, established musicians such as Art Tatum and Benny Carter, came too, as did the Hollywood celebrity crowd. The music, however, was misunderstood in the main. The people were used to the vocals of Slim Gaillard and Harry "The Hipster" Gibson. Although Parker and Gillespie recorded with Gaillard (the famous Slim's Jam on Savoy) and were presented on Rudy Vallee's national radio show by Gibson, their audience and the people who came to hear Gaillard and Gibson were not reconciled. Opening night was big, but as the week went on the crowds diminished, and the hip minority did not order drinks often enough to make the cash register ring with any consistency.

RED CALLENDAR They didn't really understand it. It was a little above them. They were used to hearing pop melodies turned into jazz. But these guys took popular songs and wrote another line above the harmony. That's what "Groovin' High" was, "Whispering." Ray Brown had three strings on his bass. I took him an A-string.

-160-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Swing to Bop: An Oral History of the Transition in Jazz in the 1940s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - The Road 9
  • 2 - Roots and Seeds 32
  • 3 - Minton's and Monroe's 75
  • 4 - Fifty-Second Street 118
  • 5 - California 160
  • 6 - Big-Band Bop 184
  • 7 - The Bop Era 219
  • 8 - End of an Era 291
  • Epilogue 318
  • Index 321
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.