The Fate of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties

By Mark E. Neely Jr. | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Alexander H. Stephens, A Constitutional View of the Late War Between the States, II ( Philadelphia: National Publishing Co., 1868-70), 448.
2.
The technical term is "suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus," but I refer to it with briefer phrases throughout the book, as is common practice among constitutional historians.
3.
For a summation see Frank L. Klement, Dark Lanterns: Secret Political Societies, Conspiracies, and Treason Trials in the Civil War ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Univ. Press, 1984); Joel H. Silbey, A Respectable Minority: The Democratic Party in the Civil War Era 1860-1868 ( New York: W.W. Norton, 1977).
4.
William Starr Myers, A Study in Personality. General George Brinton McClellan ( New York: D. Appleton-Century, 1934), 464.
5.
Milton Cantor, "The Writ of Habeas Corpus: Early American Origins and Development"," in Harold M. Hyman and Leonard W. Levy, eds., Freedom and Reform: Essays in Honor of Henry Steele Commager ( New York: Harper & Row, 1967), 74.
6.
Frederick J. Blue, Salmon P. Chase. A Life in Politics (Kent: Kent State Univ. Press, 1987), 31-40. The famous Matson slave case, argued in 1847, is discussed in John A. Duff, A. Lincoln, Prairie Lauyer ( New York: Rinehart, 1960), 130-45.
7.
John Codman Hurd, The Law of Freedom and Bondage in the United States, II ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1858-62), 195n.
8.
Thomas D. Morris, Free Men All: The Personal Liberty Laws of the North, 1780- 1861 ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1974), 56; Dallin H. Oaks, "Habeas Corpus in the States, 1776-1865", University of Chicago Law Review, XXXIII ( 1965), 268- 69, 278-79.
9.
Morris, Free Men All, 112.
10.
Hurd, Law of Freedom and Bondage, II, 745. President Millard Fillmore worried that the law might violate the constitutional guarantee of the writ of habeas corpus, but Attorney General JohnJ. Crittenden ruled that the provision properly carried out Congress's constitutional duty to "deliver up" fugitives. See Albert Kirwan, John J. Crittenden: The Struggle for the Union ([Lexington]: Univ. of Kentucky Press, 1962),267.

-237-

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The Fate of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Actions Without Precedent 3
  • 2 - Missouri and Martial Law 32
  • 3 - Low Tide for Liberty 51
  • 4 - Arrests Move South 75
  • 5 - The Dark Side of the Civil War 93
  • 6 - Numbers and Definitions 113
  • 7 - The Revival of International Law 139
  • 8 - The Irrelevance of the Milligan Decision 160
  • 9 - The Democratic Opposition 185
  • 10 - Lincoln and the Constitution 210
  • Epilogue 223
  • Notes 237
  • Index of Prisoners of State 269
  • Index 273
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